This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together. Will you help?

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Those who study history will attest to the fact that before every war in the world, there was some sort of powder keg waiting to explode.

From the Revolutionary War and the Civil War to the World Wars… history follows the same path. There’s a buildup… and then an explosion.  Chaos ensues.

America is sitting on that powder keg right now.  We’re arguably more divided as Americans than we’ve been since the Civil War.

Blame it on social media. Blame it on givers and takers. Blame it on whatever you want.  None of it matters, because Americans aren’t ready for a solution – they are too busy ripping each others’ throats out on Facebook and Twitter.

But you know what’s really scary?  Politicians are now using our law enforcement officers as pawns.  Look no further than states across the country that are preventing local law enforcement from supporting I.C.E. – or even responding to calls for help from agents in life or death situations.

This is not the America we know.

This is a strategic and targeted attack on the Thin Blue Line to use politics to divide our nation’s sheepdogs.  And we can’t let it happen.

We’re all taught that the media is supposed to remain neutral.  They haven’t.  You can’t pick up a newspaper or put on the news without seeing a very clear agenda.

Conventional wisdom says that law enforcement should avoid controversy.  But we as a media company and voice for law enforcement no longer can. And here’s what we’re doing to begin fighting back.

First of all, we’re proud to officially announce that Jason Piccolo is joining our team at Law Enforcement Today as a director.

Dr. Jason Piccolo
Dr. Jason Piccolo is a career federal agent, a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom, former ICE Supervisor, and a nationally recognized whistleblower for the 2015 release of Unaccompanied Alien Children to criminal sponsors.

You’ve probably heard Jason’s name before or seen him on the national news, where he makes regular appearances.

Dr. Jason Piccolo is a career federal agent, a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom, former ICE Supervisor, and a nationally recognized whistleblower for the 2015 release of Unaccompanied Alien Children to criminal sponsors.

Jason’s position – at his own request – is unpaid.  His mission is to help strengthen the bond between local, state, regional and federal law enforcement.  It’s to help give a voice to the men and women who serve and protect our communities and our country and to bring together EVERYONE who holds the Thin Blue Line.

Second, we’re excited to announce a new regular newscast – Law Enforcement Today. In every episode, we take on topics of the week that impact the LE community.  It’s co-hosted by LET National Spokesman Kyle Reyes, representing the civilian side, and Lt. Ryan Shea from a Connecticut police department.  We bring on experts or contributors each week and focus on the TRUTH behind the stories surrounding the Thin Blue Line.

(Above: A preview of an episode of Law Enforcement Today’s weekly newscast.)

Each week, we’re putting a preview of the show on LET’s Facebook page and the full episode on LET Unity – accessible for free.

Click here to check out our first few episodes.

LET Unity is a new platform we launched to help bridge the gap between civilians and civil servants.

We started noticing the problems a couple of years ago.  Social media was scaling back the reach of content that it didn’t believe people should see.

Not that there was anything offensive about it.  We’re talking about pro-police videos, stories about patriotic Americans and more. 

And from our perspective, that created a huge problem.  We have some of the greatest warriors in the world.  Yet their voices and their stories were being buried.

The mainstream media, on the rare occasion that it would tell some of these stories, would give you only a piece of them.  They’d cram as much as they could into a 90 second segment, slap their bias on it and that was it.

We needed to fix it. And so we are.

Law Enforcement Today (LET) is proud to announce the beta launch of LET Unity – a new home focused on bridging the gap between civilians and civil servants.  We’ve merged with The Whiskey Patriots to massively expand content, rolling out hundreds of videos to members.

 Many of those in our focus groups dubbed it the “Netflix of the law enforcement community”.  But the truth is, it’s so much more.

The first officer in the door at the Pulse nightclub shooting. 

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

Emergency responders from the Parkland shooting. 

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

The bomb squad that responded to the Aurora movie theater massacre. 

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

Survivors of the Dallas five killings.

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

The first Marine Guard hostage in the Iran crisis. 

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

The CIA agent who started a counter human trafficking company. 

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

SWAT teams. 

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

Sniper schools. 

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

World War II veterans.

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

And so, so much more.

The membership is less than the cost of two coffees a month, and those who sign up for an annual membership will get some surprise bonuses in the mail.  We decided to charge a nominal fee so we could take all of the proceeds and reinvest them into capturing more of these stories.

On top of that, we’re opening up the platform to some well-known podcasters who are going to be joining the team with some incredible content soon.

We have a problem in society.  Censorship has created an existential threat to democracy.  But even worse is the risk we run that some of these incredible stories of patriotism, hope, faith and our Sheepdogs would be lost.

We’ll soon be launching a series of content with Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.) to share the stories of survivors.  We will also be dropping a weekly law enforcement focused newscast that addresses some of the most important topics in the country… and helps bridge the gap between those who serve and those whom they serve.

On top of that, we’ll soon be rolling out a series of private discounts and special promotions to members only as a “thank you” for being a part of the family.

The beta platform is live and the apps for Apple, Android, Apple TV and Roku will be launching soon. 

We hope you’ll join us in this journey, knowing that your membership is going to give a voice to those who have been silenced for so long.

Click here to sign up.

Over the coming months, Law Enforcement Today will be announcing the expansion of a brand ambassador program, a new section where we share the stories of wounded officers, a new portion of the website to share the stories of survivors and so much more.

We need to stand up and recognize what’s happening in America.

Look no further than what happened in Washington on Saturday.

Police were forced to take the life of a “protester” who attacked an ICE detention center, armed with a rifle and molotov cocktails. 

But the violent attack apparently won’t stop protesters from continuing to march on these centers.

Police identified the deceased suspect as Willem Van Spronsen, age 69. And Saturday wasn’t the first time that he’s gone after members of law enforcement. According to records, Van Spronsen was at a protest last year when he lunged at an officer’s neck. He was arrested for assault. 

 

Court documents alleged that Van Spronsen jumped on the back of an officer and “wrapped both of his arms around Officer Robillard’s neck and shoulders,” while the officer was trying to detain a protestor.

A friend of Van Spronsen described him as an anarchist and an “anti-fascist”.

“He was ready to end it,” she said. “I think this was a suicide. But then he was able to kind of do it in a way that spoke to his political beliefs. I know he went down there knowing he was going to die.”

GET ACCESS TO OUR EXCLUSIVE COMMUNITY – CLICK TO LEARN MORE ABOUT LET UNITY – THE VOICE OF PROTECTORS

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?

 

Other activists tried to turn the blame on the federal agents after Van Spronsen was killed, painting them as the violent ones.

“I think what is clear is that somebody died right outside the detention center. The detention center is a dangerous place,” protester Maru Mora Villalpando said.

Perhaps she didn’t take note of the parts of the story where her fellow “activist” threw molotov cocktails at people and tried to destroy property, including buses meant for deportations. 

This man is bringing law enforcement and supporters across America together.  Will you help?
Van Spronsen, 69, had previously been arrested for assaulting an officer. (KOMO News)

 

Villalpando says the protests will continue.

“We want people to know that we’re not going to be afraid, we’re going to be organized, and we’re going to fight back,” activist Maru Mora Villalpando said.

 

Authorities say Van Spronsen showed up the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma with a rifle and homemade molotov cocktails.  They say he hurled incendiary devices at both the facility and nearby propane tanks, setting a vehicle on fire.

It happened around 4 a.m. local time.  Police yelled out to the man to stop him before shots were fired.  It’s not yet clear how many shots were fired and whether he and police fired at each other.

According to police spokesman Loretta Cool, the officers weren’t wearing body cameras. With that said, the area is covered by surveillance cameras from the detention center. 

“He was throwing these items at the building in an effort to set it on fire. It didn’t work, it’s a concreate building,” said Officer Loretta Cool with the Tacoma Police Department.

 

As per department policy, the four officers involved were placed on administrative leave. None of them were injured.

ICE put out a statement no employees “were harmed nor involved in this tragic incident.”

The shooting came mere hours after a rally in front of the detention center to protest planned mass deportation raids around the country.

The Tacoma facility is run by the Department of Homeland Security.  It holds migrants pending deportation proceedings.

The 1,575-bed Northwest Detention Center is run by GEO Group. They say Van Spronsen’s attack was unwarranted. 

“Our facilities have never been overcrowded, nor have they ever housed unaccompanied minors,” the statement said, noting that the facilities “offer modern amenities” like air conditioning, recreational activities, medical care and legal services.

In an email to The Associated Press, group administrators said baseless accusations about how detainees are treated at its facilities “have led to misplaced aggression and a dangerous environment for our employees, whose safety is our top priority. Violence of any kind against our employees and property will not be tolerated. We are thankful for the quick and brave action by the Tacoma Police Department, which prevented innocent lives from being endangered.”

PBA to NYPD: Protect ICE
PBA to NYPD: Protect ICE

 

It was at the center of a lawsuit last year, where a federal judge ruled that Washington state could pursue its suit seeking to force GEO Group to pay minimum wage for work done by detainees at the detention center.

The Trump administration’s child separation policy was the subject of a contentious Congressional hearing Friday.

During that time, former ICE director Tom Homan defended law enforcement amid criticism from Democratic politicians.

“As a 34-year veteran of law enforcement, it is shocking, shocking to see constant attacks against those that leave the safety and security of their homes every day, put on a Kevlar vest and put a gun on their hip and risk their own safety to defend this nation,” he said, at times appearing to get choked up as he defended his former colleagues.

Also on Saturday, a battle over flags at the detention center went back and forth between protesters and center personnel.

 

Protestors screamed at the sky outside an ICE facility and pulled down the flag so they could raise the flag of Mexico.

 

Then, they also removed a “Blue Lives Matter” flag, spray-painted it with the words “Abolish ICE,” then raised the flag upside-down, on a pole next to the Mexican flag.

 

The protestors were gathered in Aurora, Colorado outside a federal facility. Inside that facility are people who broke the law and snuck into the country.

Protestors were upset about ICE raids that are scheduled to begin Sunday in Denver and other major U.S. cities.

Aurora police Chief Nick Metz said the majority of protesters were peaceful.  At those protests, parents exploited their children to send a political message.

 

The protest is part of a well funded series of events dubbed #LightsForLiberty, also being called the “March to Close Concentration Camps”.

We picked a side – the side of those who hold the Thin Blue Line.  What about you?

 

 

 

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