Former sheriff: our duty is to uphold the Constitution, not follow politician’s personal agendas

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MOSES COUNTY, Ariz. – Former Graham County, Arizona Sheriff Richard Mack has a message for all of law enforcement. He says it’s one that will help take America back… one county and one state at a time.

According to Mack, the role of law enforcement is not to write traffic tickets and break down doors in drug operations, but rather to uphold the laws of the Constitution. 

Former sheriff: our duty is to uphold the Constitution, not follow politician's personal agendas
Mack says the duty of police isn’t to enforce the law, but to uphold the Constitution. (Adobe Stock)

 

He addressed the crowd gathered for the Constitutional Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association (CSPOA) in the theater at Big Bend Community College on Saturday night. 

Mack says the federal government and our elected leaders have run amok, and therefore our officers are being tasked with problems that they shouldn’t be forced to deal with, and are often unclear about what responsibilities they truly have. These problems, Mack says, come from overzealous politicians and unjust laws being enacted in various states and counties across the country.

criminal justice aide
“Liberty. That’s what we are after. That the goal here. Not writing tickets or seizing homes.” (Wikipedia)

 

Mack says members of law enforcement should follow the laws determined by our nation – not individual leaders with personal agendas. He says too many people are serving time in prison because of unjust laws.

“We can take America back one county and state at a time,” he said. “Sheriffs and chiefs of police have a duty to uphold the Constitution.”

Mack explained that it isn’t law enforcement’s role to “enforce the law,”but rather to “secure these rights” outlined in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

Third Amendment
CSPOA aims to inform local law enforcement about their true sworn duties. (Wikipedia)

 

“Liberty. That’s what we are after. That the goal here. Not writing tickets or seizing homes,” he said. He cited positive and negative examples of policing to further explain his point.

The Columbia Basin Herald laid out Mack’s examples.

‘As an example of how peace officers should behave, he showed a video of an Albany County, New York deputy who was asked by managers of the local airport to remove a young woman who was handing out pamphlets informing people they could opt out of a full body scan at airport security. The deputy refused, saying that she was perfectly entitled by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution to hand out pamphlets in the airport.’

Mack said that the officer had it right, securing the rights of that individual as made clear by the Bill of Rights.

‘And as an example of how peace officers should not do their job, Mack showed a video of a Stockton, California, man whose apartment was stormed by deputies early one morning because his wife — who was not there at the time — was delinquent on her student loan payments.’

“It’s hard to do your job right when you don’t know what it is and you aren’t trained the right way,” Mack said.

That’s what CSPOA does. They inform members of law enforcement and elected officials on the state and county levels of how the Constitution relates to the the oath they swore when they were elected or appointed to their positions.

Former sheriff: our duty is to uphold the Constitution, not follow politician's personal agendas
Former sheriff Richard Mack, founder of CSPOA. (Wikipedia)

 

“The feds are not our boss,” he finished.

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Former sheriff: our duty is to uphold the Constitution, not follow politician's personal agendas

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