Protecting the criminals: U.N. condemns Nigeria’s laws that will castrate rapists and execute pedophiles

Share:

The Governor of Kaduna in Nigeria recently signed new laws into effect that stiffens the penalties for sex offenders in hopes of deterring the massive amount of sexual violence they have seen in the area. 

Yes, the laws are tough, however, the citizens of Kaduna feel them necessary to stop the epidemic of sexual violence in the area.  Now, the United Nations has publicly condemned the new penalties, saying they are “draconian.”

The UN is unhappy that those who are convicted of rape would be subjected to surgical castration, and those who rape children 14 and younger would be put to death. 

Imagine how drastically sex crimes would drop if these perverts knew that they faced these penalties.  And yet, the UN feels they know better than those that rule that area and are calling them out for the penalties. 

Michelle Bachelet, the UN’s High Commissioner for Human Rights, and former President of Chile, believes the punishments that Kaduna have currently in place are inhumane.  She said:

“Tempting as it may be to impose draconian punishments on those who carry out such monstrous acts, we must not allow ourselves to commit further violations.”

Instead of continuing with these punishments, it is Bachelet’s belief that regardless of what type of punishment is given to a person, it does not deter crime.  In her mind, the certainty that there will be punishment is what would deter crime.  She said:

“Penalties like surgical castration and bilateral salpingectomy will not resolve any of the barriers to accessing justice, nor will it serve a preventive role.  Surgical castration and salpingectomy violate the absolute prohibition of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment under international human rights law.”

Kaduna passed these laws after they saw a significant increase in sexual violence against people during the COVID-19 lockdowns in their country.  From March to July, there were 717 reported rape cases and over 7,000 cases in which a victim alleged they had been raped but did not report it to authorities. 

Sadly, this is nothing new for the country which seemingly has always had an issue with sexual violence.  According to UNICEF:

“One in four girls and ten percent of boys have been victims of sexual violence.”

While there be many factors to blame, one glaring example appears to be their legal system and how police handle the complaints when the sex offense get reported.  Wanda Ebe, herself a survivor of rape, said:

“They [victims] are either vilified for their dressing, being at the wrong place at the wrong time or accused of making up claims of rape.”

And when cases did get prosecuted, even though the law required up to 14 years in prison for the offense, Ebe states that the offenders would often get much lighter sentences.  She said:

“The penalty for rape in Nigeria is up to 14 years in prison, but I have seen a judge sentence someone to just four years, with two years suspended, because he was young and had a life in front of him…What about the victim whose life he adversely affected?”

The African country began looking into doing something drastic to deter and deal with the rapists after the very public incident involving Uwaila Omozuwa, who was brutally raped and killed at her church.  This incident shocked the conscious of the nation so badly that there were mass protests as a result.

Omozuwa was a 22-year-old student who had been studying at her local church.  Her half-naked body was found lifeless in a pool of blood at a location where she had been a choir member for years.

Chidi Nwabuzor, a spokesman for the Edo Police Command, said:

“The item used in the assault, which was a fire extinguisher, was recovered.  Immediately the operatives…screened the [extinguisher] for fingerprints which led to our suspect.” 

The victim’s sister, Judith Omozuwa, said that she wanted to become a pastor and minister to the area.  She was saddened that the victim had been brutally murdered in such a way at her family church.  Judith said:

“[Uwaila] wanted to be a minister and preach the word of God…that she was murdered where she always found peace is just devastating.”

Do you want to join our private family of first responders and supporters? Get unprecedented access to some of the most powerful stories that the media refuses to show you. Proceeds get reinvested into having active, retired and wounded officers, their families and supporters tell more of these stories. Click to check it out.Milwaukee "mother" charged with reckless homicide in the shooting death of her two-year-old daughter

Rapists to be surgically castrated then sentenced to life in prison under a new law – should it expand in America?

September 20, 2020

KADUNA, NIGERIA –Rape is perhaps the most degrading, demeaning, dehumanizing crime that could ever be committed against a person. 

It is horrific enough when the victim of that rape is an adult, it is even worse when it is a child. 

Now Nigeria, which is facing an epidemic of rape, has toughened their punishments for the offenses in hopes of deterring it. 

A regional governor in Nigeria has decided that people who commit the crime of rape of an adult, will be castrated.  Those who are convicted of child rape, will be put to death.

The amount of rape that has occurred in Nigeria soared during the COVID-19 lockdown in the area.  As a result, the region of Kaduna, which is situated in north-western Nigeria, has issued a state of emergency due to the increased violent crime.

The new punishments were signed into law by Kaduna Governor Nasir Ahmad el-Rufai after pushing from women’s groups in the country.  Prior to the law going into effect, the maximum sentences were 21 years for an adult rape, and life in prison for a child rape. 

The Governor advised that the punishments were necessary in order to protect children in the region.

The area reported almost 800 cases of some form of sexual violence from January of this year until May.  This was a huge increase which prompted many, including women’s rights groups, to push for some kind of stronger punishments to deter the heinous crimes.

Advocates believe the actual number of rapes are actually much higher than the 800 or so that have been reported since the beginning of the year.  Nigerian women are afraid of admitting that they have been raped and reporting who raped them.  They also tend not to trust the Nigerian judicial system which has seen little successes in convicted criminals.

Now, for any man who is convicted of raping a person over 14 years-of-age, he will be castrated.  After the castration, the man will be sentenced to life in prison.  For any man convicted of raping a child 14 or younger, they will be executed.

Women who commit the offense will have their fallopian tubes removed for raping anyone under 14.  If they rape a person over 14 years of age, they will be sentenced to life in prison.

UNICEF, who, according to their website, “works in over 190 countries and territories to save children’s lives, to defend their rights, and to help them fulfil their potential, from early childhood through adolescence,” has reported that Nigeria has had significant issues concern sexual violence.  They report that one in four young females have been sexually abused before reaching 18 years of age.

The African country began looking into doing something drastic to deter and deal with the rapists after the very public incident involving Uwaila Omozuwa, who was brutally raped and killed at her church.  This incident shocked the conscious of the nation so badly that there were mass protests as a result.

Omozuwa was a 22-year-old student who had been studying at her local church.  Her half-naked body was found lifeless in a pool of blood at a location where she had been a choir member for years.

Chidi Nwabuzor, a spokesman for the Edo Police Command, said:

“The item used in the assault, which was a fire extinguisher, was recovered.  Immediately the operatives…screened the [extinguisher] for fingerprints which led to our suspect.” 

The victim’s sister, Judith Omozuwa, said that she wanted to become a pastor and minister to the area.  She was saddened that the victim had been brutally murdered in such a way at her family church.  Judith said:

“[Uwaila] wanted to be a minister and preach the word of God…that she was murdered where she always found peace is just devastating.”

 

Want to make sure you never miss a story from Law Enforcement Today?  With so much “stuff” happening in the world on social media, it’s easy for things to get lost.  

Make sure you click “following” and then click “see first” so you don’t miss a thing!  (See image below.)  Thanks for being a part of the LET family!

Facebook Follow First

Share:
Related Posts