Chicagoland: Seven-time convicted felon cuts ankle monitor, gets arrested again – this time with a stolen motorcycle

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CHICAGO, IL — A convicted felon, seven times over, was arrested once again in Streeterville, an upscale neighborhood in Cook County.

According to Assistant State Attorney Loukas Kalliatasis, the suspect Anthony Moore, 63, walked out of his house and left behind his ankle monitor back in September 2021. He was under house arrest for pending burglary and stolen vehicle charges.

The judge overseeing those cases issued a warrant for his arrest on escape charges, but he remained on the run until March 9th.

A 911 call was place shortly after 9 p.m. reporting a theft in progress at 400 North McClurg Court according to Chicago police. When police arrived, they found Moore sitting on a motorcycle with its lights on. The ignition was not engaged.

When Moore was approached, he apparently struggled with the officers and was subsequently tazed and taken into custody.

According to a report by CWB Chicago news, police determined that the motorcycle had been reported stolen. A backpack in Moore’s possession contained seven screwdrivers, an electric multi-tool, and a set of pliers.

These are all considered burglar tools under certain circumstances, including this one. Kalliatasis said Moore was charged with possessing a stolen motor vehicle, possession of burglar tools, aggravated battery of police, criminal trespass and resisting. Judge David Navarro set bail at $50,000 on these charges.

According to the State Attorney, Moore had been convicted of possessing burglar tools three times in 2012 along with a burglary conviction that year as well. He had previous motor vehicle convictions in 2006 and 2001 according to Kalliatasis.

Just a little over a year ago, the Illinois Legislature passed a bill that alters the way police and other law enforcement officers operate in the state, despite strong objections from both police and citizens. HB 3653 passed both the state House and Senate in just a few hours — before lawmakers could debate it, or even finish reading the whole thing.

Illinois State Sen. John Curran said his office received more than 500 calls opposing the amendment since it was introduced in the legislature, particularly around a provision that will remove cash bail from the state. This bill also received pushback from the law enforcement organizations across the state, including the Illinois Law Enforcement Coalition and Chicago’s Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 7.

“It ties the hands of police officers while pursuing suspects and making arrests and allows criminals to run free without bail,” the Illinois Law Enforcement Coalition said in a statement. “In the dark of night, Illinois legislators made Illinois less safe.”

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed the bill in February, setting the stage for more drastic reforms like this to sweep the country. Most provisions went into effect July 1, 2021, and cash bail is expected to be fully eliminated by January 2023.

 

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While the Chicago police are continuing their efforts to keep streets safe, the courts seem to be relying on ineffective electronic monitoring of individuals released without bail.

It has gotten so bad that CWB Chicago, a community news group, was formed to report on crimes, statistics and trends in the Chicago area that the city refuses to address.

Electronic monitoring, for instance, has become so ineffective that CWB Chicago has initiated “Electronic Monitoring Appreciation Week” to highlight the number of offenders who continue to commit crimes while being monitored.

On March 14, 2022, CWB reported that James Sutton, who was on electronic monitoring while fighting charges that he shot a man, had a gun in his pocket during a traffic stop last week. He is now facing additional charges of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

In another case, Joshua Noah fired a gun into restaurant ceiling while on an electronic monitoring device for more than 27 felonies, including home invasion, carjacking and kidnapping.

According to retired Riverside Police Chief Tom Weitzel, Joshua Noah, the man charged, “is an extremely violent individual and should never have been out on bond or electronic monitoring.” He went on to say that “judges have been using electronic monitoring for reducing jail population and saving dollars.”

In yet another case involving electronic monitoring for a violent home invasion, Juan Rodriguez, 41, was initially held without bail but subsequently released with an ankle monitor.

As a result of a search executed at his home, he was found in possession of a loaded gun, ammo, 10 pounds of marijuana, and a stash of cocaine worth $14K prosecutors allege.

These are only a few examples of electronic monitoring failures that are occurring just in Cook County alone.

Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart said last year it wasn’t worth the cost to upgrade because most people on EM were accused of low-level, non-violent offenses.

“Now, there’s a different level of people being put on there,” Dart said.

Earlier this month Law Enforcement Today reported on a murder suspect who cut off her ankle monitor and escaped:

New Orleans woman out on $7,600 bond for murder re-arrested after she cuts off ankle monitor and runs

NEW ORLEANS, LA – A 20-year-old woman out on a bond of just $7,600 for a murder charge has been rearrested after apparently attacking a relative, cutting off her ankle monitor and avoiding capture for half a day.

Byrielle Hebert cut her ankle monitor about 2:30 a.m. March 3 after fighting with a relative with whom she was staying. A warrant was issued for her arrest, and she was recaptured just after 4 p.m., law enforcement sources told Fox 8.

Hebert’s original $302,000 bond had been reduced to $7,600 on Feb. 14.

Hebert and two other suspects are facing first-degree murder charges in connection with the May 8, 2019, slaying of 63-year-old Zelda Townsend. The New Orleans grandmother was shot in the head and killed during a car burglary outside her home.

Hebert, Emanuel Pipkins and Alvin Robinson — who were 18, 17 and 16, respectively, at the time of the shooting — were indicted by an Orleans Parish special grand jury three months later on first-degree murder charges, as well as other charges related to the deadly burglary. All three defendants are scheduled to go to trial June 6.

Townsend and her husband, Danny, confronted the burglars outside their Cleveland Avenue home in the Mid-City neighborhood shortly after 10 p.m. Authorities with the New Orleans Police Department said the couple came out of their home to investigate a car alarm and discovered Pipkins rummaging through their automobile and attempted to hold him inside the vehicle.

That’s when, police said, Pipkins opened fire on the couple, striking Zelda Townsend in the head, killing her, and Danny Townsend in the arm. Pipkins was later located at a hospital with a gunshot graze wound to his back, leading police to believe more than one teen shot at the couple.

Police said the gun Pipkins allegedly used was connected with a double shooting the night before when another couple came upon a car burglary outside the Lots A Luck Tavern on Homedale Street.

In announcing the indictments in 2019, District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro said Townsend’s killing was part of a planned crime spree. All three face mandatory life sentences if convicted. Cannizzaro, who has since retired, said:

“The tragic murder of Zelda Townsend was not simply part of some one-off, youthful indiscretion. This investigation has revealed that these teens were engaged in a deliberate, planned series of car burglaries in which they used stolen cars and were willing to shoot people without hesitation once they were cornered.”

So, now that Pipkins’ alleged accomplice is back in custody, just who was it who let a murder suspect facing a life sentence out on a bond of just $7,600? That would be Criminal District Court Judge Angel Harris, a former defense attorney.

Hebert’s attorney, Eusi Phillips, had sought Hebert’s release from custody outright under Article 701, which governs a Louisiana defendant’s right to a speedy trial. Phillips had argued that his client had not had her day in court in the nearly three years since her arrest. He must have neglected to inform the court that the defense team itself was responsible for most of the delays.

The prosecutor’s office had one continuance granted in September 2019 and the defense three — in November 2019, December 2019 and July 2020.In addition, Hebert’s trial was delayed for three months in 2019 when defense attorneys asked the court to evaluate her mental competency. After being examined, Hebert in November 2019 was found competent to stand trial. The case was also delayed when Orleans Parish courts were shuttered for COVID-19 mitigation and by Hurricane Ida, and last, but not least, a successful effort by the defense to get an incriminating statement by one of the defendants suppressed by the Louisiana Supreme Court.

Rafael Goyeneche, president of the independent watchdog Metropolitan Crime Commission, condemned Judge Harris’ decision. He stated:

“I think it sends the wrong message to the public that people that are committing the most serious crimes aren’t being treated appropriately by the criminal justice system, which undermines confidence in the entire criminal justice system.”

Assistant District Attorney Alex Calenda gave immediate notice of the state’s intent to appeal the judge’s decision and Harris set a March 14 deadline for DA Jason Williams’ office to file a writ request with the 4th Circuit Court of Appeal. Of course, that’s a moot point, now that Hebert is back in custody due to her own actions.

In a prescient statement, Williams’ First Assistant, Ned McGowan, said:

“Our ADA vigorously objected against the reduction of Hebert’s bond. Our office believes that Hebert is a danger to the community and do not support the court’s position.”

But who cares if a defendant is a danger to the community?

Harris unseated longtime incumbent Judge Franz Zibilich for the Section L seat in November 2020 and has made several controversial bond decisions in her short time on the bench.

For instance, during her second month on the bench, Harris reduced to $100,000 a $250,000 bond set by Judge Zibilich for armed robbery suspect Brian Andry. Harris lowered Andry’s bond in February 2021, and he was freed a month later after making the lowered bond. Three months after that, Andry was arrested for stabbing to death 7th Ward physical therapist Portia Pollock, 60, and stealing her car.

Rafael Goyeneche, president of the independent watchdog Metropolitan Crime Commission, condemned Judge Harris’ decision. He stated:

“I think it sends the wrong message to the public that people that are committing the most serious crimes aren’t being treated appropriately by the criminal justice system, which undermines confidence in the entire criminal justice system.”

Assistant District Attorney Alex Calenda gave immediate notice of the state’s intent to appeal the judge’s decision and Harris set a March 14 deadline for DA Jason Williams’ office to file a writ request with the 4th Circuit Court of Appeal. Of course, that’s a moot point, now that Hebert is back in custody due to her own actions.

In a prescient statement, Williams’ First Assistant, Ned McGowan, said:

“Our ADA vigorously objected against the reduction of Hebert’s bond. Our office believes that Hebert is a danger to the community and do not support the court’s position.”

But who cares if a defendant is a danger to the community?

Harris unseated longtime incumbent Judge Franz Zibilich for the Section L seat in November 2020 and has made several controversial bond decisions in her short time on the bench.

For instance, during her second month on the bench, Harris reduced to $100,000 a $250,000 bond set by Judge Zibilich for armed robbery suspect Brian Andry. Harris lowered Andry’s bond in February 2021, and he was freed a month later after making the lowered bond. Three months after that, Andry was arrested for stabbing to death 7th Ward physical therapist Portia Pollock, 60, and stealing her car.

In a horrific bit of progressive “justice,” Harris in November 2021 set a $12,500 bond for New Orleans teen Tyrese Harris after Williams’ office refused to prosecute an armed robbery count and instead charged the teenager with aggravated flight from an officer after a man’s car was stolen at gunpoint in August. Tyrese Harris was released on that bond in December. Police say that on Jan. 3, he murdered 12-year-old Derrick Cash and on Feb. 3 he injured Realtor Kelleye Rhein during a carjacking at a Costco gas station.

Democrat District Attorney Williams was a criminal defense lawyer for more than 20 years before running on a progressive platform.

Rafael Goyeneche, president of the independent watchdog Metropolitan Crime Commission, condemned Judge Harris’ decision. He stated:

“I think it sends the wrong message to the public that people that are committing the most serious crimes aren’t being treated appropriately by the criminal justice system, which undermines confidence in the entire criminal justice system.”

Assistant District Attorney Alex Calenda gave immediate notice of the state’s intent to appeal the judge’s decision and Harris set a March 14 deadline for DA Jason Williams’ office to file a writ request with the 4th Circuit Court of Appeal. Of course, that’s a moot point, now that Hebert is back in custody due to her own actions.

In a prescient statement, Williams’ First Assistant, Ned McGowan, said:

“Our ADA vigorously objected against the reduction of Hebert’s bond. Our office believes that Hebert is a danger to the community and do not support the court’s position.”

But who cares if a defendant is a danger to the community?

Harris unseated longtime incumbent Judge Franz Zibilich for the Section L seat in November 2020 and has made several controversial bond decisions in her short time on the bench.

For instance, during her second month on the bench, Harris reduced to $100,000 a $250,000 bond set by Judge Zibilich for armed robbery suspect Brian Andry. Harris lowered Andry’s bond in February 2021, and he was freed a month later after making the lowered bond. Three months after that, Andry was arrested for stabbing to death 7th Ward physical therapist Portia Pollock, 60, and stealing her car.

In a horrific bit of progressive “justice,” Harris in November 2021 set a $12,500 bond for New Orleans teen Tyrese Harris after Williams’ office refused to prosecute an armed robbery count and instead charged the teenager with aggravated flight from an officer after a man’s car was stolen at gunpoint in August. Tyrese Harris was released on that bond in December. Police say that on Jan. 3, he murdered 12-year-old Derrick Cash and on Feb. 3 he injured Realtor Kelleye Rhein during a carjacking at a Costco gas station.

Democrat District Attorney Williams was a criminal defense lawyer for more than 20 years before running on a progressive platform.

Immediaely upon taking office, Williams established a civil rights unit to review convictions, eliminated cash bail for many crimes, quit employing the habitual offender law, announced he would not prosecute juveniles in adult court, dismissed hundreds of drug cases and granted new trials to dozens of people convicted by non-unanimous juries.

Meanwhile, Williams himself is facing federal charges of tax fraud and is awaiting trial. Laissez les bons temps rouler, right New Orleans?

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