Oklahoma charging anti-police rioters with terrorism and rioting: ‘When you act like a terrorist, you will be treated like a terrorist.’

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OKLAHOMA CITY, OK – According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, domestic terrorism are acts “perpetrated by individuals and/or groups inspired by or associated with primarily U.S.-based movements that espouse extremist ideologies of a political, religious, social, racial, or environmental nature.” 

On May 30th, what occurred in Oklahoma City definitely fit that definition.

Oklahoma County District Attorney, David Prater, agrees. And, even more importantly, he’s actually going to prosecute those who committed terroristic crimes!

Prater said:

“When you act like a terrorist, you will be treated like a terrorist. This is not Seattle. We’re not putting up with this lawlessness here.”

The incident in question was a riot that had started over the death of George Floyd.  Although the homicide did not occur anywhere near Oklahoma City, that did not stop several people from showing up and voicing their displeasure with policing and the United States as a whole. 

During the riot, Isael Antonio Ortiz torched a Sheriff’s van and tried to start a bail bonds office ablaze. 

Ortiz is no stranger to the law, as he is on probation for fleeing and attempting elude police officers and currently facing charges from a drive by shooting in 2019. 

Eric Christopher Ruffin assisted Ortiz and was working to get the crowd excited at destroying the law enforcement van. 

Malachai Davis was charged for damaging the same bail bonds business in the area.  He was apparently captured on video breaking the windows with brass knuckles.  In addition to these, close to twelve others were arrested for rioting. 

Court briefings from police showed:

“Several people were carrying flags that were identified as belonging to the following groups: Antifa, Soviet Union (communism), American Indian Movement, Anarcho-Communism (solid red) and the original Oklahoma flag … currently adopted by Oklahoma Socialists.”

DA Prater chose to charge the mentioned suspects with terrorism charges because, unlike places like Seattle, as he aptly pointed out, Prater wants people to know that there will actually be consequences if the law is broken. This is why we have law: to discourage others from doing more damage. 

Prater’s approach has been decried by members of the ACLU who stated the charges were excessive and only motivated by political reasons. 

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Murdered officer's grave desecrated before headstone even placed

They issued a statement that read in part:

“Urgent use of the harshest possible charges to retaliate against protesters is part of the broader injustice and systemic racism we join Black leaders on the ground in condemning.

“We continue to join with our partners in the community in following the lead of Black Lives Matter OKC in asking that all charges against protesters be dropped. And (we) encourage people to contact their elected District Attorney David Prater … to join in that ask.”

The ACLU continued by saying that any type of talk regarding property damage done at these protests “diminishes and diverts attention away from the reason thousands are protesting and demonstrating.”  Perhaps the ACLU needs to understand the definition of a riot versus a protest. 

According to Merriam-Webster, a riot is a violent public disorder specifically: a tumultuous disturbance of the public peace by three or more persons assembled together and acting with a common intent or a public violence, tumult, or disorder. 

A protest is a solemn declaration of opinion and usually of dissent. 

Last time I checked, something that is done in a solemn manner is not destroying property and injuring people.

Regardless of whether Prater’s charging of the men in this case was an act which was politically motivated, the elements of that crime were definitely met by the actions taken by those accused. 

Just because those accused don’t want to face the consequences doesn’t mean they didn’t do the crime.

No one is asking for protests to stop.  Peaceful protests are protected in the United States, no one is disputing that. 

In fact, officers will even work hard to ensure that those who protest and demand to “defund the police” can do so safely.  But when the peaceful protests turn into any type of violence or destruction, it simply can’t continue and, at least in Oklahoma, the law will be enforced. 

The people who were charged with terrorism made a conscious decision to disregard the laws of that state in destroying businesses and vehicles.  That destruction will cost the owners of the business, their insurance company, the city and county governments thousands if not millions of dollars to fix what was destroyed that night. 

Being angry at someone or something doesn’t give you the right to damage property or bring violence on other people. 

Law Enforcement Today would like to commend DA Prater for his actions, and his statements. There are too many people believing that because this group of people is angry, that means they can run the streets and do whatever they want.

It’s important to remember that there are MANY more law-abiding citizens who want law and order, and who want those who act like terrorists to get treated like terrorists. Unfortunately, there aren’t enough DA’s who have the guts to actually charge those committing crimes how they should be charged, or even at all sometimes. 

DA Prater has shown that he is willing to do his job, and to do it well. He will ensure that those who are keeping streets full of violence see the consequences to the full extent of the law.

Let’s get a few more DA Prater’s on board, America!

 

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