Is U.S. Attorney Durham dropping two-year investigation into ‘Spygate’ to ‘appease Biden’?

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WASHINGTON, DC – One report claims that U.S. Attorney John Durham might be dropping the infamous “Spygate” investigation two years after it began, causing concern that no one will be brought to justice for spying on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and alleged misconduct on behalf of intelligence officials and law enforcement.

Trump has long asserted that the FBI and Obama administration-era officials spied on his campaign and later attempted to spread disinformation tying him to Russia.

According to Sean Davis of The Federalist, a source, who is allegedly familiar with Durham’s investigation, recently informed the web magazine:

“Durham isn’t doing anything. Dropping his investigations. He’s worried about blowback from Biden. What an absolute disgrace.”

In September, Time suggested that Attorney General William Barr ultimately is the person who will control how and when Durham’s findings are presented.

Barr himself said that his initial review of the origins of the Russia probe produced more questions than answers. In an ABC interview last year, Barr said:

“I don’t want to speculate. What I will say is I’ve been trying to get answers to questions and I found that a lot of the answers have been inadequate and I have also found that some of the explanations I’ve gotten don’t hang together. In a sense I have more questions today than I did when I first started.

“The fact of the matter is [special counsel] Bob Mueller did not look at the government’s activities. He was looking at whether or not the Trump campaign had conspired with the Russians.

“He was not going back and looking at the counter intelligence program, and we have a number of investigations underway that touch upon it.

The main one being the office of inspector general that’s looking at the FISA warrants. But as far as I’m aware, no one has really looked across the whole waterfront.”

So, what exactly has Durham been quietly investigating?

In the spring of 2019, Durham’s mission included looking into a number of countries, including Ukraine, that were involved in the counterintelligence investigation directed at Trump’s campaign during the 2016 election.

According to Justice Department spokeswoman Kerri Kupec, Durham’s mandate was to determine whether “intelligence collection activities by the U.S. government related to the Trump 2016 Presidential Campaign were lawful and appropriate.”

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Durham also was tasked with looking into the scandal that involved using Hillary Clinton’s opposition research to lie about Trump being a “Russian asset” to hide her email and private server scandal.

The bad intelligence was used to lie on applications to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA). It was later learned in leaked documents that President Obama was made aware of Clinton’s plot by then-CIA Chief John Brennan.

Last week, former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe said he had regrets after agreeing to a FISA application that sought to renew surveillance on former Trump campaign aide Carter Page in 2017.

McCabe made the admission during a Senate Judiciary Committing hearing last week. McCabe was asked by Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) about whether he would have signed the warrant application in 2017 to surveil Page if he knew then what he knows now.

McCabe replied, “No sir.” He also added:

“I signed a package that included numerous factual errors or failed to include information that should have been brought to the court.”

So far, Durham’s investigation has resulted in one guilty plea from former FBI attorney Kevin Clinesmith, who admitted to making a false statement when he altered an email used in a request for a warrant against former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page.

It’s not known whether Durham is pursuing other criminal matters, but Barr has traveled internationally to enlist the support of foreign officials in Durham’s investigation, including to the U.K. and Italy, according to Time.

Also, if Durham does not have any other criminal indictments resulting from his investigation, typically the Justice Department would refrain from making much information public.

Time noted the Department tends not to release information about what it has found about someone if that person isn’t going to be criminally charged.

In December of 2019, Justice Department Inspector General (IG) Michael Horowitz released a report based on his own office’s probe of “Crossfire Hurricane.” Horowitz found that the FBI had adequate justification to open the investigation and did not find evidence of political bias in the decision.

While Horowitz did acknowledge he found lying and wrongdoing by those involved, some were not charged, including former FBI Chief James Comey, because the IG’s office had no authority to refer charges against those no longer under the purview of the government agency, according to PJ Media.

However, both Durham and Barr publicly disagreed with some of Horowitz’s conclusions. Durham released a statement saying:

“Based on the evidence collected to date, and while our investigation is ongoing, last month we advised the Inspector General that we do not agree with some of the report’s conclusions as to predication and how the FBI case was opened.”

At the time, some interpreted Durham’s statement as suggesting that criminal indictments might be forthcoming in the future.

Some thought Durham might charge people prior to this year’s presidential election, but others thought he would follow the unwritten “60-day rule” that urged caution on taking major action in any politically significant cases within a window of time before an election if it could affect the results.

Thus far, Durham’s investigation has not affected the election, and there haven’t been any more charges publicly revealed.

New York Times declared Durham’s investigation as essentially over in October:

“Part of Spygate’s fizzle may be related to the fact that three years on, none of Mr. Trump’s political enemies have been charged with crimes.

“Last year, a highly anticipated Justice Department inspector general’s report found no evidence of a politicized plot to spy on the Trump campaign — angering believers who thought the report would vindicate their belief in a criminal ‘deep state’ plot against the president.”

The Epoch Times reported on Nov. 16 that Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) expects Durham to release a report “real soon.”

Jordan, the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, spoke with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo on Sunday and told her Durham is “doing his work” and to “expect some kind of report” in the near future. He also expressed the frustration that others feel:

“Like you, I am frustrated that it didn’t happen sooner, but, look, you and I can’t prosecute anyone. We can’t indict anyone. All we can do is get the facts out to the American people. The Justice Department has to do that. I’m hopeful they are going to have something real soon for the American people.”

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