Human remains found among 55-gallon drums near Texas: ‘Killing field’ miles from U.S. / Mexico border

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TAMAULIPAS, MX – According to a report from Breitbart News, Mexican activists that were combing through a rural area not far from Rio Bravo had allegedly stumbled upon what was described as a “killing field” mere miles away from the border of Texas.

Said discovery took place in late January of 2021, while locals were in the process of trying to search for missing loved ones that may have been the victims of cartel kidnappings.

What they found instead was an abandoned warehouse hosting 55-gallon drums and human remains. There are suspicions that these large drums may have been used to incinerate these located victims.

Locals and activists that were searching through the area also found shell casings outside of the discovered drums – suggesting that the victims were likely shot before being incinerated. The practice of burning bodies is often attributed to cartels within the Mexican state of Tamaulipas.

The state of Tamaulipas happens to be an area where there’s a lot of conflict between a faction of the Los Zetas and also the Gulf Cartel, with regard to controlling the territory.

Currently, no officials within Mexico have publicly released any of the details related to the discovered warehouse.

Sources allegedly told Breitbart News that a, “special office within the federal attorney general’s office,” along with the Mexican National Guard have responded to the scene and are actively working it and collecting samples.

According to a report from Diario Del Narco (Narco Diary), the “special office” referenced in the Breitbart report was the Fiscalía Especializada en la Investigación de Personas no Localizadas (Specialized Prosecutor’s Office in the Investigation of Unlocated Persons).

It is currently unclear how many deceased victims this alleged abandoned warehouse hosts.

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We at Law Enforcement Today just so happened to have recently reported on another gruesome discovery that also happened in Tamaulipas earlier in January.

And much like this latest report, this incident from earlier in the same month involved numerous charred bodies of deceased individuals.

Here’s that previous report from January 26th.

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TAMAULIPAS, MX – According to reports, Mexican authorities were said to have found the bodies of 19 people that had apparently been shot prior to being found inside two separate burning vehicles along a dirt road in Camargo, Tamaulipas.

While the deaths haven’t been explicitly attributed to any cartel activity, the area in question where the bodies were located happens to be not only rife with cartel activity – but is often a subject of cartel-against-cartel conflict for control of the area.

The Tamaulipas state prosecutor’s office announced that the bodies were discovered on January 23rd, with local authorities having responded to reports of there being vehicles on fire spotted in the area.

When authorities had responded to the scene, they had happened upon two vehicles still actively burning – one of which contained four bodies and the other one containing 15 cadavers. Some discarded rifles were also found at the scene.

While all the victims had apparently been shot, authorities were unable to locate any shell casings at the site of the burning vehicles.

This anomaly leads investigators to suspect that the victims were likely killed elsewhere and simply dropped off in those burning vehicles in Camargo.

One official within Carmargo, who was speaking under conditions of anonymity, alleges that the killings actually transpired on January 22nd – but that simply locals were afraid to report them to authorities.

This alleged fear from locals being worried about reporting burning vehicles to authorities in Carmago once again likely points back to the fact that cartel-led organized crime happens to be an issue in the municipality of Camargo.

Said municipality happens to be the type of area that cartels covet to gain control of, considering that it is one of the many areas that resides relatively close to the Texas border.

Carmago rests relatively close to a territory that was predominantly controlled by the Gulf cartel, but a faction of the Los Zetas known as the Northeast cartel has been working to gain control of the area.

Around this same time last year in January of 2020, a neighboring town of Carmago known as Cuidad Mier also saw the likes of 21 dead bodies – most of them burned and found in various vehicles – being discovered.

And in January of 2019, the town of Miguel Aleman had 24 dead bodies discovered – 15 of which were also set ablaze.

So, while the recently discovered bodies aren’t necessarily being explicitly attributed to cartel activity, the circumstances seem to bear a lot of the trademarks of cartel-styled assassinations.

There have been some rumors going around that some of the victims among the 19 individuals found deceased work Guatemalan migrants.

While that has not been confirmed, the Foreign Affairs Ministry stated that Guatemala’s embassy in Mexico and consulate in Monterrey were in communications with state and federal authorities to determine whether any of the victims were in fact Guatemalan.

To put into perspective, the number of cartel-styled assassinations that transpired in Mexico in 2020 were 34,523 assassinations. Just one year before that in 2019, there was 34,608 assassinations in Mexico.

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