“Practicing our ‘toxic masculinity,’” wrote my buddy Graham Allen with an Amerian flag emoji. “Hey Gillette, does this offend you? I’ll raise my kids the way I believe they should be…thanks for your advice.”

 

As Graham would say… dear America – this one’s gonna sting.

 

I’ve had the pleasure of calling Graham a friend for several years.  He’s one of the most patriotic men I’ve ever met.  He served his country and continues to do so.

 

And he’s no stranger to controversy, triggering countless people who disagree with him on his Blaze TV Show called “Rant Nation”.

 

But after a recent Facebook post calling out Gillette for their man-shaming ad, he damn near broke the internet.

 

Graham posted this picture on his Facebook page of his family in a cotton field.  As you can see, he’s carrying his rifle on his shoulder. His young daughter is in the middle, and his young boys are on either side of her holding a handgun and a shotgun.

Graham Allen

He put up the post to call out Gillette for its divisive ad which was targeting what many refer to as “toxic masculinity”.

 

Graham, who is a U.S. Army vet, was making quite the point against the video which pandered to the #MeToo movement, essentially implying that men with facial hair are bullies who sexually harass women, build gender stereotypes and who espouse violence.

 

The video garnered more than 20 million YouTube views, including a half million likes and a million dislikes.

 

Gillette, in a spineless move, swears they weren’t trying to divide.

 

“We weren’t trying to court controversy,” Gillette brand director Pankaj Bhalla told Fast Company. “We were just trying to upgrade the selling line that we’ve held for 30 years — the Best a Man Can Get — and make it relevant. I don’t think our intention was to have controversy just for the sake of controversy.”

 

“I want to be respectful to the folks who didn’t necessarily like the ad and had a point of view on it — they are absolutely entitled to it. But the ad is not about all men being bad. It’s the exact opposite of that,” he said. “There’s a part where we say, ‘We believe in the best in all men.’ It’s literally right there in the ad! The intention is to say, ‘All of you guys are great; how about you be an even better role model for your kids?’ That’s it. That’s the ad.”

 

Media on the left has been absolutely melting down over the photo.  I’ve watched countless comments fly about how Graham is a misogynist and a racist and a sexist and every other line that those without facts like to pull.

 

And so today, I’d like to share a tell-all about my experiences with Graham.

 

I first met Graham in Savannah, Georgia when he had only about a million followers.  His audience is now considerably larger.

 

Most people who become internet celebrities have their heads blow up pretty quickly.  They’re fast to cast off strangers and roll their eyes at selfies.

 

Not this guy.

 

He was the definition of a southern gentleman.

 

Over the years, we’ve spent a considerable amount of time together.  I have yet to see Graham not hold the door open for a lady.  I have yet to see him refer to a woman in a way other than ma’am.

 

I’ve watched him take time away from his family to go out of his way to thank those who hold the thin blue line.

 

I’ve watched people attack him and go after his family, and yet I’ve watched him shrug it off and still treat them with respect – knowing that he took it to heart but wasn’t about to let it show.

 

Graham and I have sat and had cocktails with men and women, gay and straight, black, white, Hispanic, and everything else.  To us they were all simply people.  You’re not judged on what you look like, who you pray to, who you sleep with or what parts you have – you’re simply judged on whether or not you’re a good person or a bad one.

 

It’s funny how so many who are quick to judge will also be the first to hide behind men like Graham when violence strikes.

 

Graham is a man who loves his family tremendously and works to promote causes to protect children. He’s fiercely loyal to his country and will give you the shirt off his back.

 

He’s been stabbed in the back in business.  He’s been screwed over.  He’s been taken advantage of.  He’s been targeted personally and professionally, and those who don’t agree with his perspective will do anything they can to destroy him.

 

I’m sure he’ll never get a sponsorship by Gillette.  But he sure does have the support of Law Enforcement Today.

 

What is a man?  A man is someone who fights for his family and his country, even when it hurts.

 

Graham Allen is that man, and I’m proud to call him a friend.


 

A message from Graham and I to the families of fallen police officers:

 

A second tribute to those who made the ultimate sacrifice holding the Thin Blue Line:


Interview with Graham Allen on The Hustle in 2017:

 

Graham and I sounding off in 2017:

 

Graham on The Whiskey Patriots with Ken Kraus, the first Marine Guard hostage in the Iran Crisis: