Far-left anarchist accidentally lights his comrade on fire with a Molotov cocktail

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THESSALONIKI, GREECE – In a protest that was reportedly aimed at seeing police officers barred from operating on university campuses in Greece, one protester managed to ignite another on fire by way of a Molotov cocktail.

Based upon some of the video obtained from the “protest” in question that was held earlier in April, the appearance of the goings on was something more akin to a riot that nearly resembled an active combat zone.

According to reports, this rally that was staged reportedly started off peacefully – but a group of roughly 100 rioters started to violently engage police, throwing the likes of Molotov cocktail petrol bombs.

From what the Greek newspaper Proto Thema reported of the riot, one of the protesters present was accidentally hit in the leg by a Molotov cocktail that was thrown toward police officers.

As seen in the video below, the individual that was reportedly struck by this Molotov cocktail can be seen writhing on the ground as responding officers use a fire blanket in an effort to put out the flames on the man’s leg.

Apparently, the man that was accidentally set ablaze wound up being arrested himself, according to a statement from the Greek ministry of civil protection. This unnamed individual was said to have been arrested for allegedly throwing Molotov cocktails at officers himself.

Officers on scene at the riot eventually did get matters under control after employing the use of flash grenades and tear gas.

Reports pertaining to damage and injury caused from the riot noted that at least two individuals were injured, one parked vehicle was set ablaze, and numerous other vehicles were generally vandalized.

While this riot reportedly pertained to a new law that allows police officers to operate on university campuses, Greece has seen at least 100 riots or attacks since January of 2021 that are reportedly linked to supporters of a convicted far-left terrorist responsible for at least 11 murders.

Dimitris Koufontinas is currently serving 11 life sentences for 11 different murders committed between 1975 and 2000. This terrorist apparently used to be a hit man for the terrorist group Revolutionary Organization 17 November.

The group, also known as 17N, is was also designated as a terrorist organization in Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. After numerous members were arrested and tried for various crimes, the terrorist organization was defunct since around 2002.

One of the more controversial murders committed by Koufontinas is that of the brother-in-law of the active Greek Prime Minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis.

Koufontinas reportedly ended a 65-day hunger strike back in March of 2020, which was reportedly carried out in an effort for him to be moved to a prison located in Athens. 

Officials ultimately rejected the convicted murderer and terrorist’s efforts to be transferred to a lower-security prison, and Koufontinas ended the strike due to his health nearly failing due to malnourishment. 

Sources claim that many of the violent riots that spawned in January and beyond were in support of Koufontinas’ hunger strike. 

Instances of far-left demonstrators getting injured by way of their own antics is something we’ve shared before previous here at Law Enforcement Today. 

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Earlier in April, we reported on a would-be graffiti vandal taking a nasty fall while trying to scale a building in New York City. 

Here’s that previous report. 

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NEW YORK CITY, NY – A video captured outside of the Chase Bank building in Manhattan on April 2nd shows a peak example of just comeuppance, as a would-be vandal attempting to scale the building to vandalize the upper portions fell well over 10 feet – landing firmly on his side and back.

Apparently protesters have amassed throughout the streets of New York City, Washington, D.C., and various other places across the country to protest Enbridge’s Line 3 in Minnesota in recent weeks.

These protests that transpired are apparently an attempt to urge the Biden administration to pump the brakes on construction of Line 3 and the Dakota Access Pipeline.

For instance, students from Northwestern University in Illinois wound up occupying a Wells Fargo Bank lobby and started engaging in some kind of somber seeming humming/chanting that sounded so unenthusiastic that it edged on apathetic.

But one group that had gathered outside of a Chase Bank in Manhattan had bore witness to an emblematic depiction of karma for one protester trying to climb up a building wall in order to lay down some graffiti.  

In the video, the protester can be seen climbing up a stylistic wall that hosted ridges where he could grip with his hands and feet. As the man begins to shimmy up well over 10 feet in the air, he attempts to bring himself over to an adjacent elevated platform.

Yet, it seems that his grip on the adjacent platform was not as strong as he had assumed.

The protester fell well over 10 feet and landed on part of his back and side. Onlookers ran right over to help the man who’d just fallen, as the protester lets out a sort of defeated-sounding groan of pain.

Not long thereafter, one can see what appears to be black paint seeping out of the parcel on the man’s back.

A security guard on scene had urged bystanders to get back as EMS were on their way, although members of the local fire department did wind up responding.

It’s unclear at the time of this writing what the exact status is of the fallen protester.

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