Enough is Enough: It’s Time to Take a Stand for Law Enforcement

The disrespect towards law enforcement has become too commonplace; Enough is enough. Why are we not having productive conversations about the murders and horrendous treatment of police officers? Why are we not talking more about what to do in order to put an end to brutality against law enforcement? What are we as civilians doing to help put a stop to the madness? Isn’t it time to take a stand for law enforcement?

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Officers of the New York Police Department say goodbye to K9 Angel who suffered from cancer. (NYPD)

It is not good enough anymore to just have a breaking news bubble pop up on our phones to announce that something else has happened to a police officer. Sen. Elizabeth Warren made comments over the summer saying that America has a “racist” criminal justice system “front to back.” These offensive remarks do not help an already stressful and out of control situation. Of course, instead of focusing on fixing issues and helping law enforcement, the focus turns to absurd and illogical commentary such as hers. Let’s fix that.

Sgt. Sean Gannon, Sgt. Michael Chesna? Do these names sound familiar? For those in the field of law enforcement you are nodding your heads yes, others perhaps not. These are just two among a list of far too many police officers who have recently been killed in the line of duty. Why isn’t something more being done to put an end to these vicious attacks? One reason is because our news media and our daily lives are overcrowded with distractions and a constant influx of other useless information. A second reason is that politicians such as Warren are constantly going on about some prattling nonsense. Why are we not talking about what is happening to our law enforcement officers instead? It is time to take a stand and speak out against her senseless remarks and other hateful behaviors against law enforcement and try to change the situation.

Outrage is everywhere! For days Starbucks was breaking news across television screens. But, when a Dunkin’ Donuts in Virginia refuses to serve police officers it is hush-hush. Or, when a Burger King in Florida gives a police officer dirty food to eat, then you hear practically nothing. Why aren’t we talking about this more?

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In another case, in Massachusetts, a police officer was refused service at a Verizon store. The store clerk was fired, and an apology issued. Clearly, an apology is not enough. What did that police officer do to the salesperson to deserve to be the recipient of such behavior? The answer is: nothing.

While the police are not able to refuse their time or service to those who call asking for help, regardless of the situation, we need to question who is watching out for them? There is outrage everywhere for the mildest of things. People protest over the use of plastic bags and straws instead of reusables. Students are protesting about grades and stress. Why aren’t we channeling this same effort into doing something about the lack of respect for law enforcement?

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(Flicker)

Heckling officers is another issue that is senseless. Those who protect and serve civilians are subjected to this nonsense and it is time for that to stop. I have heard first-hand tales of officers being subjected to the nonsensical rantings of college-age students and other adults just for doing their job. Why isn’t this blaring across the news? The answer: because of entitlement. I find this to be a bizarre phenomenon in our society. Criticize the police but let us be sure that they are present during events to keep things secure, (hi Hollywood that’s you), and don’t forget they better show up when you dial 9-1-1, even though disrespect is rampant.

It is time that we start standing up for those who always stand up for us. How many times have you heard about or perhaps watched a police officer doing their job only to be on the receiving end of disrespect? Far too many, in my opinion. The next time you feel outrage, stop and think for a minute about what that means and why you feel that way. Is it because you are sitting at a red light? Did your coffee arrive cold? Think about your outrage and why it is not being directed in the proper way.

Social Conditioned Hesitative Behavior

Baltimore riots 2015. (Photo courtesy Baltimore Police Department)

Why aren’t we as civilians feeling infuriated by those who treat law enforcement with such disregard? Why is it not offensive that people treat police with such loathing, but they are the first to be called when something goes wrong? It is time to re-think outrage and respect and to start saying thank you. It is time to take a stand for those who work hard for us, quietly, loyally and show-up regardless of treatment.

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Lauren E. Forcucci, Ph.D. is an educator, writer, and proud American. Daughter of an immigrant, granddaughter of a veteran, friend and supporter of active-duty military, veterans, and police. Lauren has worked in higher-education teaching political science, international relations and criminal justice. Her doctoral research is in terrorism and her dissertation is titled Cyber-Jihad: Waging Virtual Terror to Create an Online Caliphate. Lauren is the owner of Limitless Edu Consulting.