Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters – businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads

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DENVER, CO – Mayor Michael Hancock, alongside Denver Police Chief Paul Pazen, Denver Director of Safety Murphy Robinson, and Sheriff Elias Diggins, addressed the lawlessness that was the “Give Em Hell” riot that took place on August 22nd.

The mayor and the local law enforcement leaders decried the acts of vandalism, arson and other criminal deeds enacted by the rioters.

Director Murphy noted that what transpired on the evening of August 22nd wasn’t some display of locals engaging in constitutionally protected speech or peaceful assembly:

“What we experienced last wasn’t a protest – it was anarchy.”

Chief Pazen noted that there were a total of 12 arrests made during the riots, seven of whom stemmed from Denver, and two from Boulder. However, the remaining three’s area of origin was not released at the time of the press conference.

One injured officer was said to have suffered a concussion and third-degree burns during the madness that ensued over the weekend.

According to Mayor Hancock, city officials “will not tolerate these actions” in their city. The District Attorney’s Office is said to be pursuing criminal cases against those who engaged in unlawful activity, and that civil charges may be pursued in order to impose restitution against alleged vandals.

In an effort to hold up on ensuring criminals in riots are brought to justice, the mayor also relieved the jail population cap that was put in place in response to COVID. Thus, meaning that there’s going to be plenty of room in jail for any aspiring miscreants.

An estimated 50 to 75 people were present when the riot was taking place outside of the Denver Police Department headquarters, with predictable calls to abolish the police while people were ironically engaging in lawlessness.

Police also released the mugshots of those arrested for various crimes during the chaos. Those arrested are as follows:

  • 21-year-old Arron Jones, arrested for obstruction (equipment prohibited)
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Aaron Jones – DPD
  • 23-year-old Bailey Yntema, arrested for throwing objects
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Bailey Yntema – DPD
  • 27-year-old Devlin Baker, arrested for obstruction (equipment prohibited)
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Devlin Baker – DPD
  • 18-year-old Isabelle Bullock, arrested for obstruction (equipment prohibited)
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Isabelle Bullock – DPD
  • 22-year-old Timothy Wempen, arrested for aggravated assault
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Timothy Wempen – DPD
  • 29-year-old Tigran Manukran, arrested for possession of a dangerous weapon
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Tigran Manukran – DPD
  • 20-year-old Stephen Merida, arrested for obstruction (equipment prohibited)
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Stephen Merida – DPD
  • 20-year-old Mariam Schwarz, arrested for obstruction (equipment prohibited)
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Mariam Schwarz – DPD
  • 19-year-old Marianne Bryne, arrested for obstruction (equipment prohibited)
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Marianne Bryne – DPD
  • 19-year-old Jordan White, arrested for criminal mischief
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Jordan White – DPD
  • 29-year-old Jill Hunsaker, arrested for obstruction (equipment prohibited)
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Jill Hunsaker – DPD
  • 20-year-old Jacob Anikow, arrested for obstruction (equipment prohibited)
Denver Police Headquarters attacked by rioters - businesses looted and vandalized as anarchy spreads
Jacob Anikow – DPD

We at Law Enforcement Today had previously reported on the carnage that played out on August 22nd. Here’s our original report as details were first emerging out of Denver.

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Broken glass on sidewalks and spray paint on walls show the path carved by rioters Saturday night as they plowed through Denver during a destructive protest.

Nine people now face charges and innocent business owners now face clean up after a group of up to 100 people marched into traffic, clashed with police officers, lit fires and shattered windows.

The Denver Police Department will reportedly soon be releasing more information on the number of arrests and the charges those arrested may face.

The event called “Give ‘Em Hell” was organized to call for the dismantling of the Denver Police Department.

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Sunday, Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser retweeted video showing someone sweeping up glass outside a Quizno’s.

He posted:

“John Lewis said it well – “Be constructive, not destructive. History has proven time and again that non-violent, peaceful protest is the way to achieve the justive and equality that we all deserve.’ Protesting has a core place in our democracy, destruction and violence does not.”

Ahead of the riot, a flyer circulated on social media platform Reddit, telling demonstrators to “bring your gear.”

It appears a similar flyer is making the rounds Sunday calling for a follow up to Saturday’s destructive march.

A post on Twitter slugged “night 2” reads:

“Last night was wild! Police abolished yet? No! Not yet! What do we do? Meet tonight at 9:30 PM at the DPD HQ.”

CBS Denver reported Saturday night that people in the group set two fires, which were quickly extinguished. The news outlet reported that, at one point, police used chemical agents to control the crowd.

9News reporter Marc Sallinger tweeted video showing police putting out a fire in the street in front of the Denver City County Building.

A separate video showed a tree on fire outside the courthouse. That post says people were throwing rocks at van belonging to the sheriff’s department.

An earlier video shows people shattering windows. Sallinger posted with it:

“People are breaking every window they see.”

Denver police told local news outlets that an officer was injured, but a spokesperson did not go into detail on how serious those injuries may be.

On August 17, Denver city council members shut down a proposal by Councilwoman Candi CdeBaca asking to replace the police force with a “peace force.”

She was the only person to vote in favor of her proposed ordinance.

The bill reads, in part:

“WHEREAS it has become evident that certain members of our community face disproportionate policing and violence based upon the color of their skin; and WHEREAS our police force is more reactive to crime than it is proactive in preventing crime; and WHEREAS there is a lack of trust between the community and the police force.”

The bill also says most members of the peace force would not have arrest powers or be armed. It reads:

“In particular, triage systems will be developed so that situations involving nonviolent, addiction, minor accidents and infractions, mental health crises and any situations that do not require it, are not responded to with armed officers unless a specific assessment is made that an armed response is warranted.”

Similar proposals have surfaced in other cities following the death of Minnesota man George Floyd while in police custody.

Some large city departments, including Seattle and Baltimore, have since clashed police budgets, prompting concerns that crime rates and violence will surge.

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