Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx keeps releasing criminals – including accused murderers and gang bangers

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CHICAGO, IL – According to reports, the rift between Chicago Police’s duty to arrest and Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx deciding to prosecute is widening – leaving questions as to what can be done when a county attorney isn’t prosecuting alleged offenders.

City Journal’s Thomas Hogan coined the standing between Chicago Police and Foxx as being at “loggerheads” with one another, writing that at first “it was low-level crimes that Foxx declined to prosecute,” then she declined to prosecute Jussie Smollett for his “hate-crime hoax”, and now she’s graduated to not prosecuting murder cases and gang shootings.

A murder case that Foxx has decided to not prosecute regarded a 7-year-old girl named Serenity Broughton, who was fatally shot on August 15th and critically wounded her 6-year-old sister. Detectives told the family of the slain girl that they had a suspect in the case and had plenty of evidence to prosecute.

Yet, the State’s Attorney’s Office claimed that the evidence wasn’t enough and declined prosecution.

Michael Broughton, the slain girl’s father, called it an “atrocity”:

“This is an atrocity and it’s happening much too frequently. It’s happening much too often and there’s nothing being done about it. There’s people going unpunished for these crimes. It’s unfathomable.”

Another matter that is drawing scrutiny is Foxx’s decision to not prosecute five men reportedly linked to a gang shootout earlier in October that left one person dead and two others wounded.

All five suspects who were arrested under suspicion of several felonies, to include murder, were released after Foxx’s office proclaimed, “the evidence was insufficient to meet our burden of proof to approve felony charges.”

A police report noting the declined charges said that Foxx’s reason for there being lacking evidence was because the alleged shooters were “mutual combatants”.

A similar argument was brought by Foxx’s office in a case she refused to prosecute from September where an 18-year-old was fatally stabbed by a 17-year-old, claiming the fatal fight was mutual combat.

To demonstrate how much ire Foxx is conjuring with her prosecutorial discretion, she’s even managed to get Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot to push back against her unwillingness to effectively do her job.

After Foxx criticized Mayor Lightfoot over raising the alarm about Foxx no prosecuting the suspects in the fatal gang shooting, Mayor Lightfoot decided to simply circumvent Foxx’s office for prosecution in the case and is bringing the evidence to U.S. Attorney John Lausch to review:

“I’ve also reached out to the U.S. attorney to ask him to also evaluate the evidence that was there to see if there’s a possibility for federal charges.”

While many know of Lighfoot as being the Mayor of Chicago, in a past life she was a federal prosecutor herself, and said that the evidence police have on the case is “compelling” for a murder charge:

“Whatever evidence that needs to be gathered, the police department is going to be Johnny on the spot and make sure we get it. But this is, to me, a very compelling case.”

Apparently, there’s multiple pieces of video evidence that captured the gang shootout that left one dead, which is why Mayor Lightfoot is standing by the evidence collected in the case:

“We cannot send a message that it is OK and you get a pass that you shoot up a residence in broad daylight, captured on film, and no consequences will happen to you. That can’t be a world that we live in.”

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One of Soros-funded Kim Foxx’s top prosecutors resigns after saying something in court that actually helped police

(Originally published May 24th, 2021)

CHICAGO, IL – The second-highest ranking official in the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office is resigning after an internal review found an oversight failure led to a prosecutor incorrectly telling a judge that 13-year-old Adam Toledo had a gun when he was fatally shot by Chicago police during a foot chase in March.

First Assistant State’s Attorney Jennifer Coleman announced she is resigning after an investigation into the statement, made by a prosecutor during a bond hearing. The statement falsely said the boy was holding a gun when he was shot.

He actually dropped the gun less than a second before being fatally shot by police.

In a proffer read by prosecutor James Murphy during the bond hearing for Ruben Roman, an adult arrested at the scene of Toledo’s shooting, the prosecution said:

“The officer tells [Adam] to drop it as [Toledo] turns towards the officer. [Toledo] has a gun in his right hand. The officer fires one shot at [Toledo], striking him in the chest. The gun that [Toledo] was holding landed against the fence a few feet away.”

The inaccurate depiction of events were attacked by some, who argued the prosecution was trying to give a false narrative of what had occurred prior to the release of body camera and surveillance video.

The videos released through the Civilian Office of Police Accountability, show the boy was holding a gun during a foot chase, but dropped it the instant before Chicago Police Officer Eric Stillman fired.

State’s Attorney Kim Foxx told the media she did not know her prosecutor would go into specifics about the shooting at the court hearing, and that she had been told the Proffer would only be described in general terms.

Foxx stressed that the prosecutor gave factually correct information, but the statement may have created a “false impression” that Toledo was holding the gun at the moment he was shot:

“The internal investigation found that the attorney (involved) did not intend to give the impression that Adam Toledo was holding the gun at the moment that he was shot.

“Despite that that was not his intention, the proper steps weren’t taken to ensure that his language, the language he used in that statement in court, had the intended effect.”

Coleman resigned just five months after she was promoted to First Assistant. Although no reason was announced for the sudden resignation, it was Coleman’s job to keep the prosecutors’ words accurate and to keep Foxx informed of courtroom happenings.

The internal review found that Murphy “was not given sufficient guidance as to what information should and should not have been” a part of his statement during the court hearing.

Although most bond court proffers are not reviewed by supervisors before being submitted, this was a special case:

“What was unique about this particular case is that it’s a case that not only was pertaining to Ruben Roman’s charges, but also a separate investigation into the shooting death of Adam Toledo by a Chicago police officer.

“So given the uniqueness of that and the pending investigation of the shooting, it certainly should have warranted additional review to make sure that what was said in court would not compromise the work that was being done on the investigation.”

The inaccurate comments were made during a bond hearing for Roman, who police say fired the shots that led to the officers’ confrontation with Roman and Toledo.

Officers responded to a ShotSpotter alert about 2:35 a.m. that morning and saw two males, Roman and Toledo, in the alley. Police allege Roman gave the gun to Toledo on March 29 around 2:30 a.m. Toledo then ran from police.

Officer Stillman chased Toledo down the dark alley while the boy carried the gun. At a fence opening, Toledo stopped. Less than one second before turning to face the officer, Toledo toss the gun behind the fence. As he turned, the officer fire one fatal round.

Prosecutor Murphy was placed on paid leave pending the investigation. The State Attorney’s Office spokesperson Sarah Stinovic, trying to distance herself form the prosecutor, said that Murphy had “failed to fully inform himself before speaking in court.”

Murphy’s paid leave resulted in low morale among prosecutors in the office. They worried that Murphy was being sacrificed, according to Foxx.

She said:

“This is about making sure that we get it right, and when we don’t get it right, owning it and what we need to do to make sure that it doesn’t happen again.”

The internal investigation concluded:

“[Murphy] did not intend to give the impression that Adam Toledo was holding a gun when shot. The investigation revealed that the language the attorney used in court was inartful, leaving an unintended impression.”

Murphy will return to his previous assignment, ending the paid leave he was placed on in early April.

The shooting remains under investigation.

The president of the Chicago police union said Officer Stillman was “100 percent justified” in opening fire on the boy.

Fraternal Order of Police president John Catanzara said:

“The offender still turned with a gun in his hand. This occurred in eight-tenths of a second.

“Time-lapse video shows that that officer had eight-tenths of a second to determine if that weapon was still in his hand or not. Period.

“There’s no way a rational person can say they can process that and their muscle reaction would be less than one second. The officer does not have to wait to be shot at or shot in order to respond and defend himself. There is no obligation whatsoever.”

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