When David Koch passed away last week, the Hollywood elite turned out to wish him a farewell. It was indicative of the intolerance we see so often coming from that sector of society. Those who pretend to be something they aren’t for a living, believing that their opinions matter more than everyone else’s.

Ron Perlman tweeted shortly after the news of Koch’s death was made public:

“Wishing the Koch brothers a speedy reunion.”

Twitter promptly issued Perlman a 12-hour ban.

His response:

“Yesterday Twitter slapped me with a 12-hour ban for a tweet referencing the Koch brothers. The day that we are silenced for calling out fascism, for pointing a finger at those who would rape and pillage the very air we breathe, may God help us!”

Once again, we see the elitist flaunting their belief that anything they want to say should be permitted while they applaud the censorship of people every day who use social media to convey a love of country, law and order, patriotism and support of the Thin Blue Line.

Perlman was not alone. Bill Maher took Perlman’s sentiment and turned it up a notch.

On the Friday night episode of HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher,” the host said:

“I’m glad he’s dead.”

Maher mentioned that Koch died of prostate cancer and added:

“I guess I’m going to have to reevaluate my low opinion of prostate cancer.”

It gets worse.

“He was 79, but his family says they wish it could be longer but at least he lived long enough to see the Amazon catch fire,” Maher said. “Condolences poured in from all the politicians he owned and mourners are being asked in lieu of flowers to just leave their car engine running.”

Maher admitted that his remarks seemed harsh and that he’d likely be condemned. He said Koch and his brother:

“Have done more than anybody to fund climate science deniers for decades.”

And so Maher says he deserved worse than he got.

“So, f— him,” Maher said. “The Amazon is burning up, I’m glad he’s dead and I hope the end was painful.

Before you think that this type of anger and hate are reserved for the wealthy that Maher does not agree with politically, here are a few things he has had to say about the men and women of law enforcement over the past few years.

His comments range from merely insulting and disrespectful to down-right disgusting.

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In 2015, he tweeted:

“As award season kicks off here in H’wood I’m reminded that no one needs their ass kissed like show people! Except maybe the NYPD.”

Former NYC mayor, Rudy Giuliani, responded on air with Sean Hannity, saying:

You know, one of the reasons why [Bill] Maher is safe is because of the LAPD. One of the reasons you and I are safe is because of the NYPD and the Nassau County police. Police officers don’t expect anybody to kiss anything. All they expect is basic respect for what they do. I’ve never really dealt with more humble people than police officers. But they just want respect.”

Mayor Giuliani understood and appreciated what the officers of the NYPD went through everyday and appreciated their service and their sacrifice, unlike the current mayor who uses police as a personal moving company and is almost single-handedly making the streets a much more dangerous place for cops.

On another episode of his HBO show, Maher said:

“Now, this week I want to say something nice about the police before we start listing all the people they shot and beat up this week that they shouldn’t have.”

(Note: this is the nice part…)

“I totally get it, that this is the most strapped country in the world. We’re armed to the teeth. When you’re a policeman, every encounter might be that kind of encounter,” Maher continued.

Then he cuts to a clip of police killing a manfor carrying an air rifle he took off the shelf at an Ohio Walmart.

“And yet, every week we see police officers going mental for no reason,” he said.

He followed that with a clip of a South Carolina policeman firing at a man as he retrieved his ID, which the officer had requested.

“This isn’t every policeman in the country,” Maher said, “but it just makes me ask, is there any training going on? I mean, [the South Carolina officer] shot this guy four times at point-blank range and only winged him once.”

Maher also said:

“Somehow police got it in their head that theirs is the most dangerous job. It’s not the most dangerous job — they have statistics on this stuff. It’s behind electricians, fishermen, cab drivers. Yet somehow they got it in their head that they have to be protected first.”

That’s on them, he says.

“This is why we see SWAT teams breaking up poker games. This is why we see the ridiculous use of Tasers. I feel like in the ’60s people called them ‘pigs,’ and that was wrong, and America’s been overcompensating ever since.”

On yet another episode of his show, he said:

“We need to stop saying that most cops are good, like we know that to be true. I hope it is true, but I need some evidence, unlike cops.”

Later in that same segment he opined:

“The bad ones, not the good ones. Problem is that we don’t really know what that percentage is. That’s the question I am asking tonight. If so many cops are good, why are there so many videos of them being bad?”

He finished by saying that because officers don’t often report abuse by fellow cops, the “blue line stuff has got to go way.”

Shortly after a sniper shot and killed 5 Dallas area officers, Maher was a guest on another show, where he was joined by a former Seattle police chief. In the interview, they all went on the offensive to attack the Dallas Police Department for how they ended the situation.

How dare the PD send in a robot with a bomb to kill the shooter?

The essence of what Maher had to say as part of this interview; according to NewsBusters, Maher blamed the cops and pretty much said they’re cowards who should suck it up and let themselves get shot because “danger is part of the job.”

He said:

“They shoot too many people because they say, ‘Well, we’re scared.’ Well, I’m sorry, but that’s part of the job, to be scared and to be brave.”

Maher is not alone in his sentiments that what cops do everyday isn’t that big of a deal.

Do you remember when MSNBC tweeted a video of a suspect dragging an officer down the road with his vehicle and asking it if counted as a ‘police chase?’

Just remember this one thing Bill. You are safe tonight, in large part to the men and women who patrol and protect the neighborhoods where your home and studios are. Sleep well knowing that they are out there, doing their jobs.

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