Bill Cosby was found guilty of sexual assault in April after a jury heard allegations from Andrea Constand. Now, the 81-year-old comedian is about to be sentenced for his crimes, which could see him on probation, house arrest or thrown in prison.

Cosby was found guilty on three counts of felony aggravated indecent assault for drugging and molesting Constand, 45, at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004.

The guilty verdict brought an end to a long-running downward spiral for Cosby, who was accused by dozens of women of similar crimes after public interest in his rape allegations was renewed, Fox News reported.

Constand’s allegations are in line with others. However, her assertions were unique since the statute of limitations on the crime had not yet expired.

Sentencing begins Monday and is expected to last two days. While the judge will ultimately have the final say in Cosby’s punishment, the potential consequences for Cosby’s crimes allow for many options.

The maximum term is 10 years per count. However, shorter incarceration, house arrest and probation are also on the table for the embattled former comedian.

Bill Cosby

Bill Cosby was found guilty on three counts of felony aggravated indecent assault for drugging and molesting Andrea Constand, 45, at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. (U.S. Navy photo by Mr. Scott King)

Given his advanced age and health issues, it’s likely that Cosby’s legal team will argue for a lesser sentence than the max 30 years. Regardless of his future, lawyers for the former beloved actor made it clear they plan to appeal the verdict.

His trial is being heralded as the first major celebrity trial of the #MeToo era. As a result, there’s massive public attention being paid to the outcome with those coming out against Cosby wondering if the court will give him a pass in terms of punishment due to his fame and notoriety.

Once called “America’s Dad,” Cosby’s reputation has been in decline since comedian Hannibal Buress brought up the numerous rape allegations against the comic in 2014. There has since been an avalanche of allegations. More than 60 women have come forward accusing Cosby of sexual related crimes and improprieties.

Cosby and his legal team have shown that they want to mitigate the amount of damage being done to his reputation, starting with the classification of him as a “sexually violent predator.” Monday’s sentencing is expected to begin with a debate over this classification.

Pennsylvania’s sex-offender board has examined Cosby and recommended he be deemed a predator, concluding that he has a mental defect or personality disorder that makes him prone to criminal behavior. Montgomery County Judge Steven T. O’Neill will have the final say Monday.