Wake up and See What Is Happening on Social Media

Are first responders Losing the social media battle? Recently I received a message from the admin of a “support police” type Facebook group. The message was quite simple, only post positive “up beat” stories and no “political posts.”

First, the group has the right and responsibility to create and enforce whatever rules they want. In addition to the Law Enforcement Today Facebook page, we have the Law Enforcement Today Radio Show page and several other group pages. A few of our group pages are quite large. We do have some rules on our group pages, but they are very lax.

“The solution is very simple when you see an accurate post about our first responders that touches you, click like, make a comment and share it.”

(Photo from the Official Presidio of Monterey Web site and is in the Public domain.)

(Photo from the Official Presidio of Monterey website and is in the public domain.)

Not an Accurate Portrayal

My problem with her asking me to only post certain types of articles that portray only a positive upbeat story is simple. That is not an accurate description of what our law enforcement officers and first responders face daily. I will go into some of those in a few moments.

It is bad enough that the social media network owners treat pro law enforcement pages like ours differently from the hater and anti-police pages. But if you haven’t noticed, the anti-police hater pages are far more effective at getting people to share their posts, then many that are supposedly supporters. And, it matters very little to the hater pages whether their content is accurate or not.

Worst of all, even after an anti-police or first responder post has been proven to be false it is still spread for months. Even after the release of the bodycam and dashcam video, they still continue to post and share the lies and false representations with no regard of the consequences.

(Photo from the Official Presidio of Monterey Web site and is in the Public domain.)

(Photo from the official Presidio of Monterey website and is in the public domain.)

Where do I start with this?

According to people like this, we shouldn’t post about law enforcement officers that are killed in the line of duty. That is an average of one officer killed every 2.2 days. So we probably shouldn’t post stories about the heartache and suffering of their families either. After all, we should only post “positive, up beat” stories about law enforcement officers and what they experience across our country. You can listen to multiple examples on the Law Enforcement Today Radio Show and Podcast.

We shouldn’t post about the thousands of law enforcement officers and first responders that are critically injured every year. Same for their families, because it would be unfair to let everyone know how much they suffer. You can listen to examples on the Law Enforcement Today Radio Show.

According to them we shouldn’t post about the untold number of first responders that are permanently injured in the line of duty, often times with catastrophic injuries and are subsequently fired, or harassed and denied coverage by workers compensation from their jurisdiction. After all, it is easier to believe when the governments say that they will take care of their first responders, even when they frequently don’t. Don’t believe us on this one? You can listen to many examples on the Law Enforcement Today Radio Show and Podcast.

Still need more proof that the governments don’t take care of their first responders when they are badly injured in the line of duty? Take a look at all the GoFundMe.com campaigns in existence to help pay the medical costs of first responders that were hurt in the line of duty. Why aren’t all of their medical costs being taken care of by the governments they served?

“The solution is very simple when you see an accurate post about our first responders that touches you, click like, make a comment and share it.”

(Photo from the Official Presidio of Monterey Web site and is in the Public domain.)

(Photo from the official Presidio of Monterey website and is in the public domain.)

No Political Posts

Since we brought up government not taking care of their first responders when they receive devastating injuries … that pretty much covers the politics, doesn’t it? I won’t get into my disdain for partisan politics.

No matter how hard we try, when we post, there are always some people that see either politics or race, no matter what the story line is. This is a statement about them, not us.

social media

(Pixabay)

What can you do to make a difference?

None of us are powerful enough to change everything on our own. After all we are just one individual, what can one person do?

At your fingertips are some of the world’s most powerful and effective marketing platforms, Facebook, Linkedin, Instagram, Twitter and others. Use them to spread the an accurate message about our first responders. Best of all they are free to use.

The number of qualified people interested in becoming law enforcement officers, first responders, corrections officers, dispatchers, etc. is diminishing. Thanks in part to the nonstop bashing, lying and absolute falsehoods that are posted and shared continually on social media. So, when you or your family needs help and 911 is called, who will come to your aid?

The solution is very simple when you see an accurate post about our first responders that touches you, click like, make a comment and share it.