And just like that, “defund the police” zealots suddenly want to “refund the police” as crime explodes

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The following contains editorial content which is the opinion of the author, a retired Police Chief and current staff writer for Law Enforcement Today. 

Two men arrested and charged with the attempted murder of a Chicago cop after shooting him during a traffic stop

USA- Unless you are new to these pages, you are aware that Law Enforcement Today recently launched an initiative to “refund” the police, a response to the defund the police mantra pervasive among the leftists in our country.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock since late May 2020,  defund the police has been the rallying cry among leftists, anarchists, and plain old miserable folks, an initiative which went on steroids in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis.

Unfortunately for the vocal left, criminals seized upon that narrative to prove exactly why that approach is such a terrible idea.

In major cities across the country, from San Francisco and Los Angeles through St. Louis and Chicago to New York City, crime has exploded to such a level that people are leaving the big cities for safer havens.

The wizards of smart thought it would be a good idea to defund the police as a means to “reform” police departments. However, as an article in Liberty Loft notes, which wasn’t such a great idea.

For example they note that in Minneapolis, homicides have nearly doubled since 2018, going from 57 that year to 91 thus far in 2021. There was also an increase in crimes such as rape, assault, and robbery. Minneapolis is a far more dangerous place in December 2021 than it was in the middle of May 2020.

What has been the result? States such as California, New York and Illinois have seen residents flee those crime-torn states and head for far less dangerous places in states such as Tennessee, Texas, and Florida.

Oh to be sure, certain cities in those states remain somewhat dangerous, however once you get out of Democratic-run cities such as Austin, Dallas, Houston, and others, you are far less likely to pay with your life for simply driving down the wrong street.

What has been the result of this exodus? Well for one, as Liberty Loft notes, “empty homes and storefronts do not generate tax revenue.” Of course not, and of course money is what motivates politicians, especially Democrats.

Say what you want about liberals, but they are clearly not blind. They can see that citizens fleeing their cities due to out of control crime are going to eventually cost them.

It’s a shame that it got to this point before these politicians would recognize the ill-conceived notion that police could be defunded and it wouldn’t have a related effect on crime.

If you’re in a city such as Minneapolis and you lose hundreds of police officers either due directly to defunding or as a result of defunding (officers leave for greener pastures or retire), it’s only a matter of time before criminals take advantage, and that is exactly what they have done.

Now we are seeing in cities from Minneapolis to San Francisco that politicians are starting to rethink the ludicrous notion that police could be defunded and it wouldn’t have an effect.

This has become especially obvious over the past few months, where we are bombarded nightly on the news with videos of gangs of thugs descending on stores, smashing windows and display cases, and running off with tens of thousands of dollars in merchandise.

This past week, San Francisco mayor London Breed was speaking and finally realized that her past statements about criminal activity was probably ill-advised, although she certainly wouldn’t admit it.

Breed was one of the first big city mayors to defund her police department, to the tune of $120 million dollars. The result of that was out-of-control crime in the City by the Bay, which Breed suddenly realized was not a good thing for income producing activities such as tourism.

Unfortunately for Breed, she has George Soros’s water boy, District Attorney Chesa Boudin to deal with.

Boudin is one of a number of DAs across the country who simply refuses to do his job. It is all fine and good to change course on defunding the police but if DAs such as Boudin sit on their hands (unless they’re grabbing Soros’s money), any such efforts will fail.

San Francisco isn’t the only city that has apparently seen the error of its ways. In Minneapolis, where only last month there was a vote to eliminate the police department and “reimagine” it as a public safety department (which failed), they have basically restored their budget to pre-Floyd levels, which we reported on earlier this month.

So as good as it is for San Francisco, Minneapolis, and other cities to have a “come to Jesus” moment, those efforts will fail without a group effort among all constituencies, including mayors, governors, district attorneys, and judges.

All have to let it be known that crime will simply not be accepted. While everyone with a modicum of common sense condemns the infinitesimal number of police officers who abuse their positions, they represent a microscopic percentage of law enforcement officers.

Police need to be allowed to do their jobs.

It’s a simple formula, really. Police arrest the bad guy, DAs prosecute the bad guy, judges convict the bad guy and sentence him to jail. It’s a formula that has worked in our country for over 200 years. And once the bad guys are locked up, keep them there. It has to be uncomfortable and inconvenient to break the law…period.

Has the damage already been done? Maybe. At one time, becoming a police officer was an honorable thing to do.

The position offered job security, rather good benefits including retirement, the opportunity for advancement and in some cases, the ability to retire with a pension after 20 or 25 years. Sure, there was a risk involved but what job doesn’t present at least some amount of risk?

Much of that has been flushed, with police work being so condemned and excoriated that police officers, instead of being looked up to as guardians of society are now looked down upon, criticized for nothing more than the uniform they put on every day.

Their wives are shunned, their children harassed and friends outside of the profession are hard to come by. Who would sign up for that?

In some cities, recruiting personnel are saying those who apply for open police positions are down, while no-shows for written exams, oral interviews and other portions of the process have all gone up significantly.

A significant number of highly qualified and trained police officers have either retired or outright quit law enforcement over the past 18 months. In addition, police academies fell victim to COVID-19, being shut down for extended periods of time.

The left vilified police work as a bad career, populated by racist killers who set out each and every day to see how many minorities they can oppress on that particular shift.

Trying to reverse that narrative and portray law enforcement for what it is—an honorable calling—is going to take some work. It will be a tall order for those who spend that 18 months slamming police to now reverse course. For cities such as San Francisco, it may be too late.

For more on Minneapolis suddenly deciding they need to “refund” their police department, we invite you to:

DIG DEEPER

MINNEAPOLIS, MN- Just over a month after voters in Minneapolis shot down a proposal to eliminate the city’s police department, The Blaze is reporting that last week, the city approved $191 million for the police department, which restores its funding to nearly the level it was at prior to the George Floyd death.

According to the Minneapolis Star Tribune on Saturday:

“Mayor Jacob Frey and the City Council last week agreed to a $1.6 billion budget that includes just over $191 million for the Police Department (MPD), restoring its funding to nearly the level it held before George Floyd was killed in 2020.”

According to the paper, the “urgency faded as crime surged and the ‘defund police’ message became a police liability.”

After the death of Floyd, attributed to former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, Minneapolis saw a push to defund the department, along with the aforementioned proposal to abolish the department.

All of that changed after Minneapolis experienced a crime wave of near epic proportions, a malady suffered by a host of Democrat-run cities across the country.

Last June, nine of the city council’s members out of thirteen voted to begin the process of dismantling the police department.

“We are here today to begin the process of ending the Minneapolis Police Department and creating a new, transformative model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis,” the council wrote in June 2020, only weeks after Floyd’s death.

Just days later, the council passed a resolution in which they declared “the intent to create a transformative new model for cultivating safety” for the Minneapolis PD.

Only a few months later, by September of last year, violent crime in the city spiked, along with property crimes. Arson increased by 55% compared to the same time period in 2019.

The crime increase occurred while at the same time, some 100 police officers quit the department in the first nine months of 2020.

As time went on, Minneapolis city leaders began to realize the error of their ways, and by February of this year, the city council voted unanimously to allocate an additional $6.4 million in funding to the police department as crime in the city exploded.

In May, the city’s feckless mayor Jacob Frey (D) who had been an advocate of defunding the department changed course and was forced to admit that limiting law enforcement had caused the spike in violent crime.

“It’s just the reality of the situation, you know,” Frey said. “When you make big, overarching statements that we’re going to defund or abolish and dismantle the police department and get rid of all the officers, there’s an impact to that. We need accountability and culture shift within our department, and we need police.”

“It’s going to take a very comprehensive effort,” Frey continued. “Yes, it includes safety beyond policing, and it includes police. And, you know, I’m one that has been working lock step with our Chief Arradondo, and I’m calling on the council members to try to work with him as well.”

In approving the additional appropriation to the police department’s budget, some city council members complained about it, yet remained silent, unlike last year, when a number of them insisted on taking money out of the police budget and directing it elsewhere.

“There wasn’t more of that type of action because there wasn’t the political will, really, to do so,” said councilor Phillipe Cunningham, who lost his reelection bid last month.

It was Cunningham who actually helped push the defunding effort last year and direct the funding into violence prevention and similar programs.

The increase in police funding was met with relief by some community groups in Minneapolis, who saw it as confirmation that elected officials were willing to abide by campaign promises to boost funding for the police, as well as other public safety services, such as the Office of Violence Prevention, which received $11.3 million in funding.

One individual who was pleased with the funding increase was Steve Cramer, president of the Downtown Council and one who spoke in favor of increasing the police budget.

“This vote is a first step on a long road back from the division over public safety that has characterized the past 18 tumultuous months in Minneapolis,” Cramer said.

Not everyone in Minneapolis was happy, including some activists who viewed it as ignoring so-called “lessons learned” after Floyd’s death, while directing too much money into a department which they claim has a history of racial issues.

“I think many people in Minneapolis feel dismayed,” said Kenza Hadj-Moussa, according to Star Tribune.

Hadj-Moussa, a spokeswoman for TakeAction Minnesota, a progressive organization continued, “What we’ve seen [is], year after year, no matter what’s happening with crime, the MPD always demands more resources.”

Cunningham, along with Council President Lisa Bender and member Steve Fletcher advocated a “Safety for All” budget, which looked to move about $8 million from the mayor’s police budget to other services, specifically those focused on mental health and violence prevention.

Last month, Minneapolis voters overwhelmingly voted to reject the ballot measure which would have eliminated the police department and replaced it with a department of public safety. After that vote went down in flames, budget negotiations opened up just two weeks later.

The “dismantle the police department” activists dominated the final budget hearings, the Star Tribune said, with many asking the city council to block Frey’s proposed budget increase to the budget as opposed to cutting it.

Two men arrested and charged with the attempted murder of a Chicago cop after shooting him during a traffic stop

The activists are also insisting on having racial discrimination investigations into the department work in a parallel fashion, with one activist claiming to have collected some 1,500 accounts of people’s interactions with the Minneapolis PD.

Dave Bicking of Communities United Against Police Brutality said, “I the mayor and the City Council have circled the wagons, and nothing is going to change unless they are forced to.”

Four council members voted against the budget, complaining about the increase to the police budget. Two councilors proposed a $3.75 million measure which would “boost mental health services, interrupt cycles of violence and evaluate which 911 calls could be handled by other agencies.”

That money will not come from the police budget but instead from the city’s general fund.

“Those of us who have stepped into leadership around public safety have had to deal with the worst backlashes and harassment and the biggest hits so folks, after a really tough election, there just wasn’t the will to do so, to fight such a major increase,” Cunningham said.

Frey joined in with the council, telling councilors he supported the programs they were seeking to boost, however suggested them to use federal aid instead. The city’s top financial officer had cautioned that depleting the city’s general fund would likely violate financial policies requiring a budget reserve.

The Star Tribune said that despite disagreements over the budget, Frey and city councilors had expressed support for expanding violence prevention programs.

“Nothing is more in flux right now in our city than our public safety needs, and our ways to address them have to be this both-and approach,” said Council Member Linea Palmisano, who was reelected last month.

For more on the ballot measure to dismantle the department, we invite you to read our prior reporting on that. 

DIG DEEPER

MINNEAPOLIS, MN – The political leaders in Minneapolis attempted to defund and replace the Minneapolis Police Department shortly after the death of George Floyd.

But they learned that they did not have the authority to do so without a ballot measure.

The question as to whether to defund the agency or not was posed to voters this year, and almost 60 percent of those voters called for keeping the agency as-is.

The voters were asked whether or not the police department should remain the same or be reimagined in what was referred to as question two on the ballot.

The specific question that was posed was if the city charter, which mandates a police department, should be changed and replaced with what was termed as a Department of Public Safety.

If the proposal would have passed, the Minneapolis Police Department would have ceased to exist. There would have been no requirements for the city to provide a certain number of police officers based upon the city’s population. The proposal stated:

“The Department of Public Safety is responsible for integrating its public safety functions into a comprehensive public health approach to safety, including licensed peace officers if necessary to fulfill the responsibilities of the department.

“Commissioner of Public Safety Department. (a) The Mayor nominates and the City Council appoints a commissioner of the department of public safety.”

One of the groups that were pushing the measure, Yes 4 Minneapolis, in their push for voters to pass the now failed proposal, claimed that this measure would not abolish the police force in the city. Per their website:

“[Abolishing] has been a lie perpetuated by the handful of very wealthy and powerful people who want to keep the Police Federation stronghold on the city through the city charter…

“The people of Minneapolis agree that there are certain situations where it is necessary for a well-trained and disciplined police officer to respond to a situation…We also know that the majority of situations where people need help, a police officer is not the appropriate response.”  

While the supporters of the bill are disappointed that their measure did not pass, they may believe it is because of what they claim are lies that this measure would have led to the abolishing of the police force.

One of the supporters, JaNae Bates, said they would push forward to find a way to transform the police department. She said alleges that the agency has a well-documented history that includes corruption and murder.

Because of this, Bates said:

“Maintaining the status quo by voting no means that we’ll continue to have a city that will devolve.”

Those who were against the measure, like Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo, Senator Tina Smith, and Democratic Governor Tim Walz all were against it. When the measure failed, Minnesota State Republican Senate Majority Leader Jeremy Miller said:

“Defunding the police was never a good idea, and I’m happy the residents of Minneapolis have made it clear they are not on board with the anti-police rhetoric.

A professional, trained, and properly staffed police force is crucial in keeping communities safe. Law enforcement is an increasingly challenging profession, and I’m grateful for the men and women who serve and protect our communities.”

Bill Rodriguez, the co-founder for Operation Safety Now, also was concerned about the changes proposed regarding the police force. Rodriguez was thankful the measure failed and said:

“Tonight is a victory for sanity and common sense in Minneapolis. Of course, there’s work to do on how we approach public safety, but the notion that we can do it without police, or with a skeleton crew of officers, is fantasy.”

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LET Unity

‘Re-fund the police!’ Poll reveals that Americans’ opinions on defunding the police have changed drastically

Editor note: This article is just one more example of why we’re launching this national crowdfunding campaign as part of our efforts to help “re-fund the police”.

For those looking for a quick link to get in the fight and support the cause, click here.

WASHINGTON, D.C.- On Tuesday, October 26th, the Pew Research Center released a new poll that revealed that Americans’ opinions on defunding the police have changed drastically since 2020. 

 

The share of adults who say spending on policing in their area should be increased now stands at 47 percent, up rom 31 percent in June 2020.

That data includes 21 percent who say funding for their local police should be increased a lot, up from 11 percent who said the same thing during summer 2020. 

The poll also reported that support for defunding the police has fallen significantly with 15 percent of adults now saying spending should be decreased, down from 25 percent in 2020. Additionally, only 6 percent now advocate decreasing spending a lot, down from 12 percent who said the same in 2020.

At the same time, 37 percent of adults now say spending on police should stay about the same, down from 42 percent in 2020. 

The survey found that black Americans and Democrats have changed their opinion on reducing police spending for local law enforcement more than white, Hispanic, or Republican adults.

According to the survey, the share of black people polled who advocate decreasing police spending in their communities dropped 19 percentage points, from 42 percent to 23 percent between June 2020 and September 2021.

 

Pew Research said that number included a 13-point drop in the share who said funding should be decreased a lot, from 22 percent in 2020 to nine percent in 2021. According to reports, the poll showed that the most notable drops in support were among black adults and people age 18 to 49. 

Both of those demographics had plurality support when Pew asked the same question in June 2020 about police funding.

The survey also showed the share of Democrats who think local police funding should be decreased dropped similarly from 41 percent in June of 2020 to 25 percent now.

The survey showed that black and Hispanic Democrats were more likely than white Democrats to advocate for increased spending on police in their area.

The Pew poll showed 38 percent of black Democrats surveyed and 39 percent of Hispanic Democrats polled wanted to actually increase spending on their local police. However, only 32 percent of white Democrats wanted to see an increase in spending on police in their area.

Pew said there was no significant difference in race or the ethnicities of those who advocated for decreased spending on police. Sixty-four percent of white Republicans and 53 percent of Hispanic Republicans support increasing spending on local police.

 

Pew Research Center said its poll showed that the age gap in views on police funding has widened in the past year, mainly because “views have shifted more dramatically among those ages 50 and older.”

The share of adults 50 and older who want to increase police spending has jumped 22 percentage points, from 37 percent to 59 percent, since June 2020. However, the share of adults under 50 who want to increase police spending only increased by 10 percent, from 26 percent to 36 percent.

The research indicated that there is a drop in support for defunding police in both age groups. The survey results said:

“Both age groups have see a drop-off in support for reduced spending on local police. These age patterns are similar among white and black adults, as well as across parties.”

Pew’s latest research found:

“Americans’ changing attitudes about police spending in their area have occurred amid rising public concern about violent crime.”

Sixty-one percent of adults said violent crime was a “very big problem in the country today” in July, up from 58 percent in April 2020. In June 2020, only 41 percent of adults said crime was a “very big problem.”

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