Report: 236K illegal immigrants accused of over 577K crimes booked into Texas jails in past decade

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TEXAS – The Texas Department of Public Safety recently issued their annual report that provides a snapshot of the correlation between crime in the state and illegal immigration.

From the latest report released in August that details jail bookings over the past decade, over 236,000 illegal immigrants have been arrested for a variety of offenses between June of 2011 and July of 2021.

According to the data provided in the report, between June 1st of 2011 and July 31st of 2021, over 236,000 illegal immigrants were booked into Texas jails for over 386,000 various criminal offenses committed during that time span.

Among some of those charges were:

  • 722 homicide charges
  • 45,569 assault charges
  • 7,277 burglary charges
  • 47,844 drug charges
  • 673 kidnapping charges
  • 19,260 theft charges
  • 30,342 obstructing police charges
  • 2,127 robbery charges
  • 4,807 sexual assault charges
  • 5,928 sexual offense charges
  • 4,145 weapon charges

Out of those over 236,000 criminal charges accumulated in the past decade, the report noted that there have been over 149,000 convictions stemming from those charges.

Among the listed convictions were:

  • 323 homicide convictions
  • 17,777 assault convictions
  • 3,839 burglary convictions
  • 21,530 drug convictions
  • 236 kidnapping convictions
  • 8,182 theft convictions
  • 13,377 obstructing police convictions
  • 1,288 robbery convictions
  • 2,295 sexual assault convictions
  • 2,829 sexual offense convictions
  • 1,593 weapon convictions
Arrest and Conviction Data for Select Offenses Associated with Illegal Criminal Aliens - courtesy of Texas Department of Public Safety
Arrest and Conviction Data for Select Offenses Associated with Illegal Criminal Aliens – courtesy of Texas Department of Public Safety

But this only represents a portion of the charges that these over 236,000 illegal immigrants have accumulated throughout their entire criminal history.

As mentioned earlier, these charges only represent the accumulated offenses between June 1st of 2011 and July 31st of 2021.

When taking into account this group’s full criminal records in Texas, the report noted that these 236,000 illegal immigrants have been charged with over 577,000 criminal offenses historically.

Among the charges from this group’s entire criminal history were:

  • 1,260 homicide charges
  • 67,533 assault charges
  • 17,535 burglary charges
  • 73,311 drug charges
  • 1000 kidnapping charges
  • 33,515 theft charges
  • 49,733 obstructing police charges
  • 4,184 robbery charges
  • 7,126 sexual assault charges
  • 8,365 sexual offense charges
  • 8,376 weapon charges

Out of those over 236,000 criminal charges accumulated throughout the group’s entire criminal history, the report stated that there have been over 254,000 convictions resulted from those charges.

Among the listed convictions were:

  • 585 homicide convictions
  • 27,984 assault convictions
  • 8,942 burglary convictions
  • 36,284 drug convictions
  • 358 kidnapping convictions
  • 15,443 theft convictions
  • 23,841 obstructing police convictions
  • 2,323 robbery convictions
  • 3,646 sexual assault convictions
  • 4,330 sexual offense convictions
  • 3,550 weapon convictions
Historical Arrest and Conviction Data for Select Offenses Associated with Illegal Criminal Aliens - courtesy of Texas Department of Public Safety
Historical Arrest and Conviction Data for Select Offenses Associated with Illegal Criminal Aliens – courtesy of Texas Department of Public Safety

Some takeaways from the report that should be considered is that these are only charges accumulated in the state of Texas, and these illegal immigrants could have charges in other states; not to mention, this report does not include any federal charges either.

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Homeland Security Secretary to let Border Agents give asylum with no hearing, brings back ‘Catch and Release’

(Originally published August 19th, 2021)

According to a press release from the Department of Homeland Security, the Biden administration is proposing a shakeup to the standard asylum process that would allow U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) asylum officers to decide on whether or not an individual can be granted asylum.

This proposal, if it comes to fruition, would modify the current practice of immigration judges deciding whether or not to grant asylum following an applicants interview with a USCIS asylum officer that found merit in an applicant’s asylum claim.

In the press release from August 18th, it was noted that both the DHS and DOJ officially announced a “notice of proposed rulemaking”, or NPRM, that aims to expedite processing asylum claims.

The way that the current method works around addressing asylum claims is that people who cross the border are interviewed by a USCIS asylum officer if they are attempting to claim asylum. During these interviews, the asylum officer would determine whether or not the individual has a credible fear of persecution.

If the USCIS asylum officer thinks the claim is bogus, the person would be deported – but if they find reason to believe the individual claiming asylum, then the USCIS asylum officer would refer the individual to the Justice Department’s immigration courts.

However, that method would be substantially changed if the NPRM winds up being adopted as policy moving forward regarding the handling of asylum claims.

Under the proposed policy amendment, USCIS asylum officers would be able to decide on asylum applications on the spot during their interviews with individuals who have crossed the border.

This would cut immigration judges out of the equation if a USCIS asylum officer grants an applicant’s asylum claim.

The only time an immigration judge would get involved in the equation is if a USCIS asylum officer adjudicates the matter and does not grant the applicant asylum, where the recourse for the individual would then be to request a “de novo administrative review by an immigration judge.”

Much of the rationale for this move is based upon the enormously backlogged caseload for immigration judges, which Attorney General Merrick Garland championed this NPRM by having the ability to remedy such:

“Today marks a step forward in our effort to make the asylum process fairer and more expeditious. This rule will both reduce the caseload in our immigration courts and protect the rights of those fleeing persecution and violence.”

Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said that this will afford relief to those deserving of asylum quicker, while also expediting removals in the event someone doesn’t fit the necessary criteria of an asylee:

“These proposed changes will significantly improve DHS’s and DOJ’s ability to more promptly and efficiently consider the asylum claims of individuals encountered at or near the border, while ensuring fundamental fairness.”

“Individuals who are eligible will receive relief more swiftly, while those who are not eligible will be expeditiously removed.  We are building an immigration system that is designed to ensure due process, respect human dignity, and promote equity.”

Another footnote attached to the NPRM is a further allowance of catch & release practices, which the press release framed as such:

“The rule also proposes a revision to the criteria applicable to grants of parole prior to the credible fear determination.  The proposal would allow DHS to grant parole when ‘detention is unavailable or impracticable,’ in addition to the existing criteria involving medical emergencies and law enforcement objectives.”

This endeavor will be subject to comments from the public starting August 20th. As of this writing, it is unclear when this rule or any modification of it would, or even will, be enacted.

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Obama-appointed judge: Prosecuting previously deported “Latinx” people is discriminatory and unconstitutional

(Originally published August 19th, 2021)

NEVADA – In an unprecedented and peculiar ruling, an Obama-appointed judge ruled that the federal law that makes it a crime to reenter the United States after having been deported is unconstitutional because it was “enacted with a discriminatory purpose.”

Judge Miranda Du issued the order regarding 8 U.S. Code § 1326 where she effectively ruled the law as being unconstitutional when dismissing a case against Gustavo Carrillo-Lopez, a twice-deported illegal immigrant who was charged under the federal law for illegally reentering the United States.

In Judge Du’s ruling, she claimed that the nearly 70-year-old law that makes it a felony to reenter the country after being deported is “discriminatory” toward “Latinx” people, based upon Carrillo-Lopez making that argument in the motion to dismiss the case against him:

“Because Carrillo-Lopez has established that Section 1326 was enacted with a discriminatory purpose and that the law has a disparate impact on Latinx persons, and the government fails to show that Section 1326 would have been enacted absent racial animus…the Court will grant the Motion.”

Judge Du’s rationale for the order was solely based upon the happenstance that 87% of individuals apprehended crossing the border illegally happen to be of Mexican descent, thereby drawing the conclusion that the law is discriminatory toward Latinos:

“The federal government’s plenary power over immigration does not give it license to enact racially discriminatory statutes in violation of equal protection.”

There were proclamations by Judge Du in her ruling that 8 U.S. Code § 1326 (which came to be in 1952) was an evolution of a 1929 Act that established immigration quotas for each country in the world:

“The evidence clearly indicates, as both parties and other district courts agree, that the Act of 1929 was passed during a time when nativism and eugenics were widely accepted, both in the country at large and by Congress, and that these racist theories ultimately fueled the Act’s passage.”

Judge Du’s ruling cited that because a deputy attorney general used racially insensitive language to describe illegal immigrants during the period of the 1950s when 8 U.S. Code § 1326 was crafted (which it has since been amended five between the 1980s and 1990s), she claims that criminalizing reentry is thus racist in today’s world:

“The government’s alternative arguments—that a nondiscriminatory motive was ‘plain’ or that subsequent amendments somehow imply the racial taint was cleansed—are not supported by caselaw nor borne out by the evidentiary record.”

In reality, the only reason that illegal immigrants of Mexican descent wind up being the largest pool of people charged with 8 U.S. Code § 1326 is a reality borne out of geographical happenstance.

Basically, Mexico and the United States literally border each other, and the southern border is unequivocally the section of the border that sees the highest level of illegal entries.

Now, the decision can certainly be appealed, assuming that the Justice Department takes it to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. If the ruling stands at the Ninth Circuit, then this would then have to ride all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court to be rectified.

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